airglow


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air·glow

 (âr′glō′)
n.
A low- or middle-latitude, more or less steady, faint photochemical luminescence visible in the upper atmosphere at night.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

airglow

(ˈɛəˌɡləʊ)
n
(Physical Geography) the faint light from the upper atmosphere in the night sky, esp in low latitudes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

air•glow

(ˈɛərˌgloʊ)

n.
a dim light, usu. visible at night, that results from ionic radiation in the upper atmosphere.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Known as an airglow, these bands of light are generated in the upper layers of our atmosphere and stretch anywhere from 50-400 miles.
CHEPSTOW Going: Good 5.10: AIRGLOW (H Turner 15-8) 1; Glamorous Rocket (11-8f) 2; Charming Guest (7-2) 3 4 ran.
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Nigel Tinkler's filly took a leap forward when second to Airglow in a hotter event at York and can resume winning ways on tonight's faster surface.
AIRGLOW (Mick Easterby) THE three-year-old gelding is yet to win six starts with Mick Easterby, but hinted that may change with a fine third to hat-trick hero Alsvinder at Catterick.
"The object was below the airglow," Detlef Koschny, who studies near-Earth objects for the ESA, said in the agency's blog post on the fireball.
To achieve this, the datasets of the two years were corrected for the changing light effects caused by the moon as well as 'seasonal vegetation, clouds, aerosols, snow and ice cover, and even faint atmospheric emissions (such as airglow and auroras) which change the way light is observed in different parts of the world.' Both datasets also cover the period of a full year in order to take seasonal changes into account.
BGU and TAU have already submitted a joint proposal to study Earth's airglow layer.