airmobility

airmobility

A capability of airmobile forces which permits them to move by air while retaining the ability to engage in ground combat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Toison in AirMobility 1961-1971 (Washington, DC: Governmenr Printing Office, 1973), 1-22.
Believers in airmobility hailed the campaign as a vindication of that concept, although they were concerned that the helicopter force, and the maintenance and logistics base supporting it, needed strengthening to deal with a likely proliferation of assaults by troops landed, supplied, given fire support, reinforced, and finally withdrawn by helicopter.
To cope with airmobility weight limits 155 mm systems are usually fitted with 39 calibre barrels, which means that their range with standard ammunition is slightly in excess of 20 km, well enough for such operations.
The 1958 Airmobility doctrine that called for rapid troops and hardware lift, combined with armed assistance to ground forces (Department of the Army, 1958, pp.
Airmobility brought them [...] but from there they would go on foot" (155).
The employment of airmobility, Gavin believed, would transform the battlefield into a three-dimensional nightmare that would overwhelm enemy commanders.
While helicopter technology was still immature, leaders such as General James Gavin believed that airmobility could reduce this vulnerability.
It was here that a new concept called "airmobility" dawned.
Airmobility is also increasingly gaining in importance on the tactical and operational level.