akrasia


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

akrasia

(əˈkreɪzɪə)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy weakness of will; acting in a way contrary to one's sincerely held moral values
[C20: from a-2 + Greek kratos power]
aˈkratic adj
References in periodicals archive ?
"Disagreement, Drugs, etc.: From Accuracy to Akrasia." Episteme 13, no.
279), que caracteriza um turbulento e polifagico estado de akrasia (incontinencia) (SERRA, 2012, p.
I will do so by offering an interpretation of the relation between Aristotle's account of akratic ignorance in Nicomachean Ethics 7 and the emphasis at the beginning of book 7 on the necessity of going through perplexity ([phrase omitted]) when inquiring into akrasia. Along the way, I hope to shed some additional light on Aristotle's conception of endoxa, his account of the so-called practical syllogism, and the distinction between ethical virtue simply and "authoritative" virtue.
Akrasia is a Greek word meaning weakness of will or acting in a way contrary to one's sincerely held moral values (Oxford Dictionary, n.d.).
Aristotle and Augustine on Freedom: Two Theories of Freedom, Voluntary Action and Akrasia. New York: St.
Akrasia: (a) enkrateia (b) weakness of will (c) summary (d) honest effort 9.
Radical epistemic akrasia is the state a subject is in when she believes p and she believes that her evidence does not support p.
Stoneking, is entitled "Abulia and Akrasia," the latter a classical Greek term for lack of self-control.
Stoneking, is entitled 'Abulia and Akrasia,' the latter a classical Greek term for lack of self-control.
Haveria tambem duas objecoes no proprio texto aristotelico: quando Aristoteles define a akrasia ou acoes acraticas, dira que haveria um deficit de autocontrole e, neste sentido, o sujeito agiria contra seus fins autenticos, no sentido daquilo que considerasse verdadeiramente bom.