albatross

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Related to albatrosses: Diomedeidae, wandering albatross

al·ba·tross

 (ăl′bə-trôs′, -trŏs′)
n. pl. albatross or al·ba·tross·es
1. Any of several large web-footed birds constituting the family Diomedeidae, chiefly of the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere, and having a hooked beak and long narrow wings.
2.
a. A source of worry or distress.
b. An obstacle to success. See Synonyms at burden.

[Probably alteration (influenced by Latin albus, white) of alcatras, pelican, from Portuguese or Spanish alcatraz, from Arabic al-ġaṭṭās : al-, the + ġaṭṭās, diver, sea eagle (from ġaṭasa, to plunge, dive; see ġṭs in Semitic roots). Sense 2, after the albatross in "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, which the mariner killed and had to wear around his neck as a penance .]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

albatross

(ˈælbəˌtrɒs)
n
1. (Animals) any large oceanic bird of the genera Diomedea and Phoebetria, family Diomedeidae, of cool southern oceans: order Procellariiformes (petrels). They have long narrow wings and are noted for a powerful gliding flight. See also wandering albatross
2. a constant and inescapable burden or handicap: an albatross of debt.
3. (Golf) golf a score of three strokes under par for a hole
[C17: from Portuguese alcatraz pelican, from Arabic al-ghattās, from al the + ghattās white-tailed sea eagle; influenced by Latin albus white: C20 in sense 2, from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798) by Samuel Taylor Coleridge]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•ba•tross

(ˈæl bəˌtrɔs, -ˌtrɒs)

n., pl. -tross•es, (esp. collectively) -tross for 1.
1. Also called gooney bird. any of several large, web-footed, mostly white birds of the family Diomedeidae, of S and tropical oceanic waters, having a large wingspread and able to remain aloft for long periods.
2. a seemingly inescapable moral or emotional burden, as of guilt or responsibility.
3. something burdensome that impedes action or progress.
[1675–85; variant of algatross frigate bird < Portuguese alcatraz pelican]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

albatross

Three under par for a hole.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.albatross - (figurative) something that hinders or handicaps; "she was an albatross around his neck"
deterrent, hinderance, hindrance, impediment, balk, baulk, handicap, check - something immaterial that interferes with or delays action or progress
2.albatross - large web-footed birds of the southern hemisphere having long narrow wingsalbatross - large web-footed birds of the southern hemisphere having long narrow wings; noted for powerful gliding flight
oceanic bird, pelagic bird - bird of the open seas
Diomedea exulans, wandering albatross - very large albatross; white with wide black wings
black-footed albatross, Diomedea nigripes, gooney, gooney bird, goonie, goony - a variety of albatross with black feet
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

albatross

noun
an albatross around your neck burden, worry, trouble, trial, weight, heavy responsibility, stress, anxiety, liability, obstruction, millstone, encumbrance The drive towards privatization could become a political albatross around the party's neck
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
albatros
albatrossi
albatrosburnica
albatross

albatross

[ˈælbətrɒs] N
1. (Orn) → albatros m inv
2. (fig) (= burden) → rémora f
to be an albatross around sb's necksuponer una rémora para algn
3. (Golf) → albatros m inv, menos tres m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

albatross

[ˈælbətrɒs] n (= bird) → albatros m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

albatross

nAlbatros m; to be an albatross around somebody’s neckein Mühlstein mum jds Hals sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

albatross

[ˈælbətrɒs] nalbatro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
I assert, then, that in the wondrous bodily whiteness of the bird chiefly lurks the secret of the spell; a truth the more evinced in this, that by a solecism of terms there are birds called grey albatrosses; and these I have frequently seen, but never with such emotions as when I beheld the Antarctic fowl.
I thanked God there were no big sea-birds in these latitudes; no molly-hawks, no albatrosses, no Cape-hens.
"Albatross," the film that inspired the two-day event, depicts the grisly deaths countless albatrosses suffer after consuming plastics in the ocean.
"As our oceans are projected to warm, fewer juvenile albatrosses will manage to survive and populations are expected to decline at a faster rate," she added.
EXCLUSIVE BY NADA FARHOUD Consumer Features Editor SHOCKING images show two young dead albatrosses, while the plastic that killed them glints in their rotted stomachs.
Albatrosses tend to attract the wrong kind of attention from witch hunters and researchers who want to expose or study them.
Other seabirds, land birds, and adult waved albatrosses were apparently unaffected.
Unmindful of the rights and privileges of others around us (the albatrosses in their respective harmlessness) we, like the Mariner, transfix them down under pretext too clumsy for logic.
A study led by PhD candidate Julie McInnes recommends ongoing monitoring of the diet of albatrosses across a network of key global sites to help understand the impact of fishing and climate change on vulnerable populations.
Albatrosses (Procellariiformes: Diomedeidae) are large birds that mostly occur in the Southern Hemisphere (Sick, 1997).