albatross

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Related to albatrosses: Diomedeidae, wandering albatross

al·ba·tross

 (ăl′bə-trôs′, -trŏs′)
n. pl. albatross or al·ba·tross·es
1. Any of several large web-footed birds constituting the family Diomedeidae, chiefly of the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere, and having a hooked beak and long narrow wings.
2.
a. A source of worry or distress.
b. An obstacle to success. See Synonyms at burden.

[Probably alteration (influenced by Latin albus, white) of alcatras, pelican, from Portuguese or Spanish alcatraz, from Arabic al-ġaṭṭās : al-, the + ġaṭṭās, diver, sea eagle (from ġaṭasa, to plunge, dive; see ġṭs in Semitic roots). Sense 2, after the albatross in "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, which the mariner killed and had to wear around his neck as a penance .]

albatross

(ˈælbəˌtrɒs)
n
1. (Animals) any large oceanic bird of the genera Diomedea and Phoebetria, family Diomedeidae, of cool southern oceans: order Procellariiformes (petrels). They have long narrow wings and are noted for a powerful gliding flight. See also wandering albatross
2. a constant and inescapable burden or handicap: an albatross of debt.
3. (Golf) golf a score of three strokes under par for a hole
[C17: from Portuguese alcatraz pelican, from Arabic al-ghattās, from al the + ghattās white-tailed sea eagle; influenced by Latin albus white: C20 in sense 2, from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798) by Samuel Taylor Coleridge]

al•ba•tross

(ˈæl bəˌtrɔs, -ˌtrɒs)

n., pl. -tross•es, (esp. collectively) -tross for 1.
1. Also called gooney bird. any of several large, web-footed, mostly white birds of the family Diomedeidae, of S and tropical oceanic waters, having a large wingspread and able to remain aloft for long periods.
2. a seemingly inescapable moral or emotional burden, as of guilt or responsibility.
3. something burdensome that impedes action or progress.
[1675–85; variant of algatross frigate bird < Portuguese alcatraz pelican]

albatross

Three under par for a hole.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.albatross - (figurative) something that hinders or handicaps; "she was an albatross around his neck"
deterrent, hinderance, hindrance, impediment, balk, baulk, handicap, check - something immaterial that interferes with or delays action or progress
2.albatross - large web-footed birds of the southern hemisphere having long narrow wingsalbatross - large web-footed birds of the southern hemisphere having long narrow wings; noted for powerful gliding flight
oceanic bird, pelagic bird - bird of the open seas
Diomedea exulans, wandering albatross - very large albatross; white with wide black wings
black-footed albatross, Diomedea nigripes, gooney, gooney bird, goonie, goony - a variety of albatross with black feet

albatross

noun
an albatross around your neck burden, worry, trouble, trial, weight, heavy responsibility, stress, anxiety, liability, obstruction, millstone, encumbrance The drive towards privatization could become a political albatross around the party's neck
Translations
albatros
albatrossi
albatrosburnica
albatross

albatross

[ˈælbətrɒs] N
1. (Orn) → albatros m inv
2. (fig) (= burden) → rémora f
to be an albatross around sb's necksuponer una rémora para algn
3. (Golf) → albatros m inv, menos tres m

albatross

[ˈælbətrɒs] n (= bird) → albatros m

albatross

nAlbatros m; to be an albatross around somebody’s neckein Mühlstein mum jds Hals sein

albatross

[ˈælbətrɒs] nalbatro
References in classic literature ?
Outward bound, and off the pitch of Cape Horn, he used to sit on the taffrail, and keep the steward loading three or four old fowling pieces, with which he would bring down albatrosses, Cape pigeons, jays, petrels, and divers other marine fowl, who followed chattering in our wake.
I thanked God there were no big sea-birds in these latitudes; no molly-hawks, no albatrosses, no Cape-hens.
Every year long-line fishing boats set about three billion hooks, killing an estimated 300,000 seabirds every year, of which 100,000 are albatrosses.
Incidental mortality from fishing has long been recognized as a threat to the long-term viability of vulnerable seabird populations, particularly albatrosses (Diomedea, Phoebastria, Thalassarche, Phoebetria spp.
HELP stamp out threats to albatrosses during the season of goodwill.
Albatrosses are the largest flying birds in the world, but it's estimated around 80,000 of them are killed each year by long-line fishing vessels.
At RSPB we have a festive plea - we need your help to stamp out threats to albatrosses during the season of goodwill.
Unlike the dodo, however, albatrosses are powerful fliers, and their young remain at sea for 5 to 8 years before returning to breed.
Huge albatrosses with wingspans of more than three metres soar above the cliffs and lighthouse at the Royal Albatross Centre, Taiaroa Head (www.
In his journal entries between January and April 1769 Banks writes numerous reports of albatrosses killed for scientific curiosity and for food.
This illustrated guide to albatrosses examines the mythology, habitat and behaviors of these large and hardy seabirds and provides a detailed glimpse of why they are able to endure some of the most inhospitable conditions on the planet.
Charles and his comrades often found dead albatrosses - killed by longline fishing wires or by swallowing plastic bags dumped in the water.