cirrhosis

(redirected from alcoholic cirrhosis)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to alcoholic cirrhosis: Alcoholic liver disease, Alcoholic liver cirrhosis

cir·rho·sis

 (sĭ-rō′sĭs)
n.
1. Any of various chronic diseases of the liver characterized by the replacement of normal tissue with fibrous tissue and the loss of functional liver cells, resulting from a variety of causes that include chronic alcoholism and certain diseases and infections, especially hepatitis C.
2. Chronic interstitial inflammation of any tissue or organ. No longer in clinical use.

[New Latin : Greek kirros, tawny (from the color of the diseased liver) + -osis.]

cir·rhot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

cirrhosis

(sɪˈrəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) any of various progressive diseases of the liver, characterized by death of liver cells, irreversible fibrosis, etc: caused by inadequate diet, excessive alcohol, chronic infection, etc. Also called: cirrhosis of the liver
[C19: New Latin, from Greek kirrhos orange-coloured + -osis; referring to the appearance of the diseased liver]
cirˈrhosed adj
cirrhotic adj

cir•rho•sis

(sɪˈroʊ sɪs)

n.
a chronic disease of the liver in which fibrous tissue invades and replaces normal tissue, disrupting important functions, as digestion and detoxification.
[1830–40; < Greek kirrh(ós) tawny orange + -osis]
cir•rhot′ic (-ˈrɒt ɪk) adj.
cir•rhosed′, adj.

cir·rho·sis

(sĭ-rō′sĭs)
A liver disease in which normal liver cells are gradually replaced by scar tissue, causing the organ to shrink, harden, and lose its function. Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by chronic alcohol abuse.

cirrhosis

a degenerative disease of the liver, marked by an excessive formation of tissue and contraction of the organ, usually brought on by chronic alcohol abuse. — cirrhotic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness

cirrhosis

Chronic inflammation of the liver (caused by severe alcoholism or hepatitis) leads to the death of liver cells. Fibrous scar tissue can build up and interfere with the liver’s functioning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cirrhosis - a chronic disease interfering with the normal functioning of the liver; the major cause is chronic alcoholism
liver disease - a disease affecting the liver
Translations

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] Ncirrosis f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] ncirrhose f cirrhosis of the livercirrhosis of the liver ncirrhose f du foie

cirrhosis

nZirrhose f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] n (also cirrhosis of the liver) → cirrosi f inv (epatica)

cir·rho·sis

n. cirrosis, enfermedad asociada con infl. intersticial, fallo en la función de hepatocitos y trastornos en la circulación de la sangre en el hígado;
alcoholic ______ alcohólica;
biliary ______ biliar.

cirrhosis

n cirrosis f; primary biliary — cirrosis biliar primaria
References in periodicals archive ?
This observation is also in accordance with the Pozzi M et al [2] study, which found no difference in the cardiac abnormalities caused by alcoholic cirrhosis and those by post viral cirrhosis along with stating that the diastolic dysfunction in the subjects were unlikely to be caused by the toxic effects of ethanol on the heart.
After applying selection criteria, the investigators identified 5,417 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis from the Danish National Patient Registry based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, Danish National Prescription Registry based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical, Danish Register of Causes of Death, and the Danish Civil Registration System from 1995 through 2014.
A 54-year-old male diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis had multiple episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.
Noninvasive assessment of portal hypertension in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.
The immunocompetent patient had alcoholic cirrhosis and decompensation of his cirrhosis because of the HEV infection.
Most recently, an allele of patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3 I148M), a triglyceride-degrading enzyme, was identified as an independent risk factor for alcoholic cirrhosis (Anstee et al.
The risk factors associated with hepatocellular carcinoma are Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, alcoholic cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome, biliary cirrhosis, and chronic liver injury.
Most of the rest is attributed to increases in suicide and in chronic liver diseases like alcoholic cirrhosis.
The following is the case of a patient taken to retransplant surgery three times due to hepatic artery thrombosis (initial indication was alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma), with residual HA thrombosis after the third transplant surgery.
The criteria for diagnosing alcoholic cirrhosis were the presence of alcohol consumption [greater than or equal to] 40 gr/day for longer than 10 years, signs of advanced liver disease including jaundice, hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, portal hypertensive bleeding, or splenomegaly, the presence of laboratory abnormalities such as low serum albumin, and/or prolonged prothrombin time, and the presence of radiologic features of cirrhosis such as a nodular liver surface, ascites, and splenomegaly.
The purpose of this article is to describe and comparatively analyze the value of DALY in terms of its components, YLL and YLD, for alcohol use/ dependence and the non-viral etiology of cirrhosis, a category that includes alcoholic cirrhosis, in the Brazilian study of the disease burden for 2008, broken down by gender and age range.
Approximately 170,000 people die from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in Europe every year.