cirrhosis

(redirected from alcoholic cirrhosis)
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Related to alcoholic cirrhosis: Alcoholic liver disease, Alcoholic liver cirrhosis

cir·rho·sis

 (sĭ-rō′sĭs)
n.
1. Any of various chronic diseases of the liver characterized by the replacement of normal tissue with fibrous tissue and the loss of functional liver cells, resulting from a variety of causes that include chronic alcoholism and certain diseases and infections, especially hepatitis C.
2. Chronic interstitial inflammation of any tissue or organ. No longer in clinical use.

[New Latin : Greek kirros, tawny (from the color of the diseased liver) + -osis.]

cir·rhot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

cirrhosis

(sɪˈrəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) any of various progressive diseases of the liver, characterized by death of liver cells, irreversible fibrosis, etc: caused by inadequate diet, excessive alcohol, chronic infection, etc. Also called: cirrhosis of the liver
[C19: New Latin, from Greek kirrhos orange-coloured + -osis; referring to the appearance of the diseased liver]
cirˈrhosed adj
cirrhotic adj

cir•rho•sis

(sɪˈroʊ sɪs)

n.
a chronic disease of the liver in which fibrous tissue invades and replaces normal tissue, disrupting important functions, as digestion and detoxification.
[1830–40; < Greek kirrh(ós) tawny orange + -osis]
cir•rhot′ic (-ˈrɒt ɪk) adj.
cir•rhosed′, adj.

cir·rho·sis

(sĭ-rō′sĭs)
A liver disease in which normal liver cells are gradually replaced by scar tissue, causing the organ to shrink, harden, and lose its function. Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by chronic alcohol abuse.

cirrhosis

a degenerative disease of the liver, marked by an excessive formation of tissue and contraction of the organ, usually brought on by chronic alcohol abuse. — cirrhotic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness

cirrhosis

Chronic inflammation of the liver (caused by severe alcoholism or hepatitis) leads to the death of liver cells. Fibrous scar tissue can build up and interfere with the liver’s functioning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cirrhosis - a chronic disease interfering with the normal functioning of the liver; the major cause is chronic alcoholism
liver disease - a disease affecting the liver
Translations

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] Ncirrosis f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] ncirrhose f cirrhosis of the livercirrhosis of the liver ncirrhose f du foie

cirrhosis

nZirrhose f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] n (also cirrhosis of the liver) → cirrosi f inv (epatica)

cir·rho·sis

n. cirrosis, enfermedad asociada con infl. intersticial, fallo en la función de hepatocitos y trastornos en la circulación de la sangre en el hígado;
alcoholic ______ alcohólica;
biliary ______ biliar.

cirrhosis

n cirrosis f; primary biliary — cirrosis biliar primaria
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers reported on their analysis of past prevalence of HCV, NASH, and alcoholic cirrhosis and prediction of future trends and their effect on hepatocellular carcinoma.
In the current study group, the micronodular cirrhosis rate was almost 18%, whereas alcoholic cirrhosis was relatively infrequent at 3% (Table 1).
Yet despite NHS guidelines, it's adults who regularly drink this amount that are at risk of needing a liver transplant due to alcoholic cirrhosis.
Ibrahim, M.D., from the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine in Springfield, and colleagues describe how nalbuphine helped manage opioid-induced urine retention in a 59-year-old man with a history of alcoholic cirrhosis who was hospitalized for worsening right-sided abdominal pain.
It is proposed that the deficiency of zinc in serum of liver cirrhosis patients, influence and potentiate the development of hepatic encephalopathy.8 The frequency of zinc insufficiency has been stated in alcoholic cirrhosis but there is a lack of these values in viral cirrhosis.
This observation is also in accordance with the Pozzi M et al [2] study, which found no difference in the cardiac abnormalities caused by alcoholic cirrhosis and those by post viral cirrhosis along with stating that the diastolic dysfunction in the subjects were unlikely to be caused by the toxic effects of ethanol on the heart.
All patients attended the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, China, from November 2014 to December 2015 and were diagnosed with decompensated liver cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis B, hepatitis C, alcoholic cirrhosis, and schistosomiasis cirrhosis.
Alcoholic cirrhosis is the end-stage serious liver disease with high morbidity and mortality and is the leading cause of liver transplantation [1-3].
In contrast, alcoholic cirrhosis has increased significantly.
Survival rates up to ten years are similar for patients receiving transplants for NAFLD cirrhosis and those receiving transplants for other indications, such as HCV cirrhosis and alcoholic cirrhosis. Guidelines for liver transplantation for patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis recommend that the indications for liver transplantation include NASH cirrhosis or HCC [54].
Liver regeneration is suppressed in alcoholic cirrhosis: Correlation with decreased STAT3 activation.
The immunocompetent patient had alcoholic cirrhosis and decompensation of his cirrhosis because of the HEV infection.