cirrhosis

(redirected from alcoholic cirrhosis)
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Related to alcoholic cirrhosis: Alcoholic liver disease, Alcoholic liver cirrhosis

cir·rho·sis

 (sĭ-rō′sĭs)
n.
1. Any of various chronic diseases of the liver characterized by the replacement of normal tissue with fibrous tissue and the loss of functional liver cells, resulting from a variety of causes that include chronic alcoholism and certain diseases and infections, especially hepatitis C.
2. Chronic interstitial inflammation of any tissue or organ. No longer in clinical use.

[New Latin : Greek kirros, tawny (from the color of the diseased liver) + -osis.]

cir·rhot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

cirrhosis

(sɪˈrəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) any of various progressive diseases of the liver, characterized by death of liver cells, irreversible fibrosis, etc: caused by inadequate diet, excessive alcohol, chronic infection, etc. Also called: cirrhosis of the liver
[C19: New Latin, from Greek kirrhos orange-coloured + -osis; referring to the appearance of the diseased liver]
cirˈrhosed adj
cirrhotic adj

cir•rho•sis

(sɪˈroʊ sɪs)

n.
a chronic disease of the liver in which fibrous tissue invades and replaces normal tissue, disrupting important functions, as digestion and detoxification.
[1830–40; < Greek kirrh(ós) tawny orange + -osis]
cir•rhot′ic (-ˈrɒt ɪk) adj.
cir•rhosed′, adj.

cir·rho·sis

(sĭ-rō′sĭs)
A liver disease in which normal liver cells are gradually replaced by scar tissue, causing the organ to shrink, harden, and lose its function. Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by chronic alcohol abuse.

cirrhosis

a degenerative disease of the liver, marked by an excessive formation of tissue and contraction of the organ, usually brought on by chronic alcohol abuse. — cirrhotic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness

cirrhosis

Chronic inflammation of the liver (caused by severe alcoholism or hepatitis) leads to the death of liver cells. Fibrous scar tissue can build up and interfere with the liver’s functioning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cirrhosis - a chronic disease interfering with the normal functioning of the liver; the major cause is chronic alcoholism
liver disease - a disease affecting the liver
Translations

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] Ncirrosis f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] ncirrhose f cirrhosis of the livercirrhosis of the liver ncirrhose f du foie

cirrhosis

nZirrhose f

cirrhosis

[sɪˈrəʊsɪs] n (also cirrhosis of the liver) → cirrosi f inv (epatica)

cir·rho·sis

n. cirrosis, enfermedad asociada con infl. intersticial, fallo en la función de hepatocitos y trastornos en la circulación de la sangre en el hígado;
alcoholic ______ alcohólica;
biliary ______ biliar.

cirrhosis

n cirrosis f; primary biliary — cirrosis biliar primaria
References in periodicals archive ?
Another report documented bacteremia and cellulitis in a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis (13).
Approximately 170,000 people die from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in Europe every year.
Analysis of subgroups indicated that treatment was effective in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.
A TEESSIDE man died in hospital of alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver and heart disease despite efforts to save him, a Middlesbrough inquest heard.
Other new research released at the congress showcased a strong link between the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in alcoholic cirrhosis patients and metabolic fatty liver disease.
Over the past 35 years I've seen perhaps a thousand patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.
Dean Warren and Robert Zeppa in 1967 for the treatment of PH, predominantly due to alcoholic cirrhosis (2,3).
This study is based on data in the remaining 448 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and proven oesophageal variceal bleeding who received endoscopic intervention for bleeding.
Mr Davies told the court Mr Ayers died from multi-organ failure and alcoholic cirrhosis.
Those with alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver - a disease that has increased markedly in Scotland in recent years - have a significantly increased risk of liver cancer.
The risk of HCC in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis is not accurately known.
In a study of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, 2 years of administration of SAMe resulted in an overall decline in mortality compared with placebo, but no statistical significance was achieved (Mato et al.