alexandrine


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al·ex·an·drine

also Al·ex·an·drine  (ăl′ĭg-zăn′drĭn)
n.
1. A line of English verse composed in iambic hexameter, usually with a caesura after the third foot.
2. A line of French verse consisting of 12 syllables with a caesura usually falling after the sixth syllable.
adj.
Characterized by or composed in either of these meters.

[French alexandrin, from Old French, from Alexandre, title of a romance about Alexander the Great that was written in this meter.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Alexandrine

(ˌælɪɡˈzændraɪn; -drɪn; -ˈzɑːn-) prosody
n
(Poetry) a line of verse having six iambic feet, usually with a caesura after the third foot
adj
(Poetry) of, characterized by, or written in Alexandrines
[C16: from French alexandrin, from Alexandre, title of 15th-century poem written in this metre]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•ex•an•drine

(ˌæl ɪgˈzæn drɪn, -drin, -ˈzɑn-)

n.
1. (often cap.) a line of poetry in iambic hexameter.
adj.
2. (often cap.) of or pertaining to such a line.
[1580–90; < Middle French alexandrin, after Alexandre, from the use of this meter in an Old French poem on Alexander the Great]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Alexandrine

an iambic hexameter, or iambic verse with six feet.
See also: Verse
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

alexandrine

A line of verse in iambic hexameter.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Alexandrine - (prosody) a line of verse that has six iambic feet
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
line of poetry, line of verse - a single line of words in a poem
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

alexandrine

[ˌælɪgˈzændraɪn] Nalejandrino m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

alexandrine

nAlexandriner m
adjalexandrinisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Conceivable the collection was arranged in the Alexandrine period.
102, of the sonnet.] The rime-scheme is ababbcbcc , and in the last line the iambic pentameter gives place to an Alexandrine (an iambic hexameter).
There was the Odeon quite near them, and Philip soon shared his friend's passion for the tragedians of Louis XIV and the sonorous Alexandrine. In the Rue Taitbout were the Concerts Rouge, where for seventy-five centimes they could hear excellent music and get into the bargain something which it was quite possible to drink: the seats were uncomfortable, the place was crowded, the air thick with caporal horrible to breathe, but in their young enthusiasm they were indifferent.
One must eat every day, and the finest Alexandrine verses are not worth a bit of Brie cheese.
In poetry, an alexandrine is a line of verse comprising how many syllables?
1837: William IV (the Sailor King) died at Windsor, and his niece Alexandrine Victoria, aged 18, came to the throne.
We can see that now even the globally threatened Alexandrine Parakeet (Psittacula eupatria) is nationally extinct from Pakistan.' he added.
Alexandrine Vo's poems have been published in England, Ireland,
Radice, Martha, Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier, (eds).
attendees can join the open discussion at the French Institute in Egypt for the representatives of the French archaeological missions in Egypt which will feature Marie-Dominique Nenna, director of the Center for Alexandrine Studies, Christophe Thiers, director of the Franco-Egyptian Center for the Study of Karnak Temples, and Berangere Redon, former scientific member of IFAO.
She was born Margrethe Alexandrine Thorhildur Ingrid to Crown Prince Frederick (future King Frederick IX of Denmark) and Princess Ingrid on April 16, 1940, barely a week after the Nazi Germany's invasion of Denmark on April 9, 1940.
He added that breeding of the Peacocks, Pheasants (Surkhab), Deer, Chukar Patridge, Alexandrine Parakeet (Speaker parrot) and some others was in progress in the district.