algebra


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

al·ge·bra

 (ăl′jə-brə)
n.
1. A branch of mathematics in which symbols, usually letters of the alphabet, represent numbers or members of a specified set and are used to represent quantities and to express general relationships that hold for all members of the set.
2. A set together with a pair of binary operations defined on the set. Usually, the set and the operations simultaneously form both a ring and a module.

[Middle English, bone-setting, and Italian, algebra, both from Medieval Latin, from Arabic al-jabr (wa-l-muqābala), the restoration (and the compensation), addition (and subtraction) : al-, the + jabr, bone-setting, restoration (from jabara, to set (bones), force, restore; see gpr in Semitic roots).]

al′ge·bra′ist (-brā′ĭst) n.

algebra

(ˈældʒɪbrə)
n
1. (Mathematics) a branch of mathematics in which arithmetical operations and relationships are generalized by using alphabetic symbols to represent unknown numbers or members of specified sets of numbers
2. the branch of mathematics dealing with more abstract formal structures, such as sets, groups, etc
[C14: from Medieval Latin, from Arabic al-jabr the bone-setting, reunification, mathematical reduction]
algebraist n

al•ge•bra

(ˈæl dʒə brə)

n.
1. the branch of mathematics that deals with general statements of relations, utilizing letters and other symbols to represent specific sets of numbers, values, vectors, etc., in the description of such relations.
2. any system of notation adapted to the study of a special system of relationship: algebra of classes.
[1535–45; < Medieval Latin < Arabic al-jabr literally, restoration]
al`ge•bra′ist (-ˈbreɪ ɪst) n.

al·ge·bra

(ăl′jə-brə)
A branch of mathematics dealing with the relations and properties of quantities. It uses letters and other symbols to represent numbers, especially in equations to solve problems or to express general mathematical relationships.
Word History For much of the Middle Ages, the center of scientific learning was not Europe, but the Islamic world of the Arabs. The Arabs studied the Greek classics of Plato and Aristotle while Europe nearly forgot about them. The Arabs were particularly interested in medicine and astronomy, and because astronomy requires making careful measurements and calculations, they became expert mathematicians. In the 800s, an Arabic mathematician named Muhammad al-Khwarizmi wrote a book called The Book of Restoring and Balancing, which explained the principles of algebra. Algebra had been developed earlier by mathematicians in Greece and India, but al-Khwarizmi's book, as the first comprehensive treatment of it, became a medieval bestseller. The Arabic word for "the restoring" in the book's title is al-jabr, which is the source of our word algebra. Al-Khwarizmi's own name is the source of another mathematical term in English, algorithm.

algebra

the branch of mathematics that treats the representation and manip-ulation of relationships among numbers, values, vectors, etc. — algebraic, adj.
See also: Mathematics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.algebra - the mathematics of generalized arithmetical operationsalgebra - the mathematics of generalized arithmetical operations
transposition - (mathematics) the transfer of a quantity from one side of an equation to the other along with a change of sign
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
pure mathematics - the branches of mathematics that study and develop the principles of mathematics for their own sake rather than for their immediate usefulness
quadratics - a branch of algebra dealing with quadratic equations
linear algebra - the part of algebra that deals with the theory of linear equations and linear transformation
vector algebra - the part of algebra that deals with the theory of vectors and vector spaces
matrix algebra - the part of algebra that deals with the theory of matrices
Translations
جَبْر، عِلْم الجَبْر
algebra
algebrabogstavregning
algebra
algebra
algebra
algebra
algebra
algebraalgebrinis
algebra
algebra
algebra

algebra

[ˈældʒɪbrə] Nálgebra f

algebra

[ˈældʒɪbrə] nalgèbre m

algebra

nAlgebra f

algebra

[ˈældʒɪbrə] nalgebra

algebra

(ˈӕldʒibrə) noun
a method of calculating using letters and signs to represent numbers.
ˌalgeˈbraic (-breiik) adjective
References in classic literature ?
Then as to the analysis of the ancients and the algebra of the moderns, besides that they embrace only matters highly abstract, and, to appearance, of no use, the former is so exclusively restricted to the consideration of figures, that it can exercise the understanding only on condition of greatly fatiguing the imagination; and, in the latter, there is so complete a subjection to certain rules and formulas, that there results an art full of confusion and obscurity calculated to embarrass, instead of a science fitted to cultivate the mind.
Because you do not know algebra," answered Barbicane quietly.
Nothing was wanting to enable him to enter upon the immediate execution of this plan, but the death of Mr Allworthy; in calculating which he had employed much of his own algebra, besides purchasing every book extant that treats of the value of lives, reversions, &c.
You may have another go at it any, time you like," generously remarked Tom, as he shied the algebra after the Latin Reader.
Davis knew any quantity of Greek, Latin, algebra, and ologies of all sorts so he was called a fine teacher, and manners, morals, feelings, and examples were not considered of any particular importance.
Grant, who are always quarrelling, and that poking old woman, who knows no more of whist than of algebra.
These are the Algebra Pills," said the Professor, taking down one of the bottles.
Physics and chemistry - you can't do them without laboratory study; and you'll find algebra and geometry almost hopeless with instruction.
By the end of the term Anne and Gilbert were both promoted into the fifth class and allowed to begin studying the elements of "the branches"--by which Latin, geometry, French, and algebra were meant.
Even Miss Pinkerton, that austere and godlike woman, ceased scolding her after the first time, and though she no more comprehended sensibility than she did Algebra, gave all masters and teachers particular orders to treat Miss Sedley with the utmost gentleness, as harsh treatment was injurious to her.
Orthography, etymology, syntax, and prosody, biography, astronomy, geography, and general cosmography, the sciences of compound proportion, algebra, land-surveying and levelling, vocal music, and drawing from models, were all at the ends of his ten chilled fingers.
I can't stop to measure insteps on algebra days; I've noticed your habit of keeping a foot in the aisle ever since you had those new shoes, so I don't wonder it was stepped on.