algorithm

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al·go·rithm

 (ăl′gə-rĭth′əm)
n.
A finite set of unambiguous instructions that, given some set of initial conditions, can be performed in a prescribed sequence to achieve a certain goal and that has a recognizable set of end conditions.

[Variant (probably influenced by arithmetic) of algorism.]

al′go·rith′mic (-rĭth′mĭk) adj.
al′go·rith′mi·cal·ly adv.
Word History: Because of its popularity over the last century, one might figure algorithm for a new coinage. The source of algorithm, however, is not Silicon Valley but Khwarizm, a region near the Aral Sea in south-central Asia and the birthplace of the ninth-century mathematician Muhammad ibn-Musa al-Khwarizmi (780?-850?). Al-Khwarizmi, "the Khwarizmian," who later lived in Baghdad, wrote a treatise on what is called algorism, or the use of Arabic numerals for mathematical computation. Despite the name by which the Arabic numerals are known in Europe, these symbols, as well as the methods for using them, were actually developed in ancient India. Europeans learned to use the numerals, however, through treatises written in Arabic by mathematicians working in the Muslim world. Algorism, the English word for computation with Arabic numerals, is derived from Al-Khwarizmi's name. The word algorithm originated as a variant spelling of algorism, probably under the influence of the word arithmetic or its Greek source arithmos, "number." With the development of sophisticated mechanical computing devices in the 20th century, algorithm was adopted as a convenient word for a recursive mathematical procedure, the computer's stock-in-trade. In its new life as a computer term, algorithm, no longer a variant of algorism, nevertheless reminds us of the debt that modern technology owes to the scientists and scholars of ancient and medieval times.

algorithm

(ˈælɡəˌrɪðəm)
n
1. (Mathematics) a logical arithmetical or computational procedure that if correctly applied ensures the solution of a problem. Compare heuristic
2. (Mathematics) logic maths a recursive procedure whereby an infinite sequence of terms can be generated
French name: algorism
[C17: changed from algorism, through influence of Greek arithmos number]
ˌalgoˈrithmic adj
ˌalgoˈrithmically adv

al•go•rithm

(ˈæl gəˌrɪð əm)

n.
1. a set of rules for solving a problem in a finite number of steps, as for finding the greatest common divisor.
2. a sequence of steps designed for programming a computer to solve a specific problem.
[1890–95; alter. of algorism, by association with Greek arithmós number. compare arithmetic]
al`go•rith′mic, adj.

al·go·rithm

(ăl′gə-rĭth′əm)
A step-by-step procedure for solving a problem, especially a mathematical rule or procedure used to compute a desired result.

algorithm

any methodology for solving a certain kind of problem.
See also: Mathematics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.algorithm - a precise rule (or set of rules) specifying how to solve some problemalgorithm - a precise rule (or set of rules) specifying how to solve some problem
formula, rule - (mathematics) a standard procedure for solving a class of mathematical problems; "he determined the upper bound with Descartes' rule of signs"; "he gave us a general formula for attacking polynomials"
sorting algorithm - an algorithm for sorting a list
stemming algorithm, stemmer - an algorithm for removing inflectional and derivational endings in order to reduce word forms to a common stem
Translations
алгоритъм
algoritmus
algoritmi
algoritam
algoritma
reiknirit
アルゴリズム
algoritmas
algoritm

algorithm

[ˈælgəˌrɪðəm] Nalgoritmo m

algorithm

[ˈælgərɪðəm] nalgorithme m
computer algorithm → algorithme informatique genetic algorithm

algorithm

nAlgorithmus m

algorithm

[ˈælgəˌrɪðm] n (Comput) → algoritmo

al·go·rithm

n. algoritmo, método aritmético y algebraico que se usa en el diagnóstico y tratamiento de una enfermedad.
References in periodicals archive ?
Terra is a protocol of money that ensures price-stability by algorithmically expanding and contracting supply.
(We explained stablecoins back in January.) DAI is what I call an "algorithmically driven stablecoin." It's designed so that the value of each token hovers around one USD.
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It will also prevent these tweets from becoming "algorithmically elevated," or more popular.
We'll also take steps to make sure the Tweet is not algorithmically elevated on our service, to strike the right balance between enabling free expression, fostering accountability, and reducing the potential harm caused by these Tweets." The company said it will only consider applying this notice on Tweets from accounts of government officials, someone running for public office, or someone being considered for a government position that has more than 100,000 followers and is verified.
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The redesigned IGTV now shows one central feed of algorithmically suggested videos based on user behaviour, instead of showing dedicated tabs, similar to how TikTok and Snapchat show content in their feed.
The ads on the Google homepage appear on what the company calls its Discover feature, a Facebook-style news feed that users swipe through to view an algorithmically personalised set of links to articles, videos and other online content.
"These panels are triggered algorithmically and our systems sometimes make the wrong call," YouTube said in a statement.
In time, AI will enable us to do this algorithmically, but first we need to draw on qualitative research and data to understand user needs and mindsets,
Ultimately, big box stores, the internet, the diffusion of the "news bundle" and the move to algorithmically targeted advertising disrupted the gravy train.

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