alienness


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alienness

(ˈeɪlɪənnəs)
n
the state or quality or being alien, foreign, or unfamiliar
References in periodicals archive ?
Pakistan then enters into the picture as the preserver of this alienness. The story of Muhammad Bin Qasim's conquest, however, is rife with historical inaccuracies.
(52.) The Chinese guest, the Cockney Piper and the upper-class English pronunciation of 'similah' demonstrate the alienness of many self-proclaimed Burnsians, who, according to MacDiarmid, indulge in a superficial representation of Scotland whilst ignoring most of the bard's work.
Alexander deftly sidesteps the wornout cliches that permeate discussions of the "alienness" of English versus the "authenticity" of Indian languages.
Product of the implanting into human brains of an alien technology, the Silencers' identity is not in and of itself alien, but rather is built around alienness as a dominant identificatory feature.
Rather, I mean that the language of the protesters pushes us toward questions about the relationship between American Jewish migration histories and other histories-legal, political, cultural and social histories of movement and settlement, alienness and citizenship, belonging and exclusion.
"The Goring" and "The Beggars", on the contrary, pinpoint the writer's disapproval of the uncanny alienness perceived around, so "Fiesta Melons" must be regarded as an exception in the sequence.
dis- location; memberment, dis- memberment; citizenship, alienness;
In Under the Skin, alienness surfaces as the digital image--the film plays with and exploits the digital possibilities of cinema to produce alienness.
In practice, my aim was to keep the line from grabbing unwelcome attention by putting together elements substantial to its function: precise baseness ("salvaje") with (now flawed) imprecise alienness ("de Oriente").
(5) Driven by who-knows-what for the unnamed, distant otherness, Merwin's night-traveler experiences the familiar alienness of the world: "I remember waking at the rivers / to see girders of gray sleepless bridges / appearing from sleep out of a current...
Thus, the intellectuals find it easy to adopt a cosmopolitan attitude towards questions of culture and identity, while poor immigrants are constantly reminded of their otherness, foreignness, and alienness.
If periodically, at the critical junctures of existence, the peasant masses demonstrate a passion for the suppression of history's order, a desperate desire to unmake history [disfare la storia] and drive it as far back as possible into the indistinctness of chaos, this derives precisely from the fact that history's order is not currently made for these masses (even if they are trying in their own way to enter it) and that what is called History and Civilization hangs over them with anguished alienness and malevolent hostility.