allegory

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al·le·go·ry

 (ăl′ĭ-gôr′ē)
n. pl. al·le·go·ries
1.
a. The representation of abstract ideas or principles by characters, figures, or events in narrative, dramatic, or pictorial form.
b. A story, picture, or play employing such representation. John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick are allegories.
2. A symbolic representation: The blindfolded figure with scales is an allegory of justice.

[Middle English allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein, to interpret allegorically : allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots + agoreuein, to speak publicly (from agorā, marketplace; see ger- in Indo-European roots).]

al′le·go′rist n.

allegory

(ˈælɪɡərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
2. (Art Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
4. (Art Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
6. (Art Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
7. anything used as a symbol or emblem
[C14: from Old French allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein to speak figuratively, from allos other + agoreuein to make a speech in public, from agora a public gathering]
ˈallegorist n

al•le•go•ry

(ˈæl əˌgɔr i, -ˌgoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the representation of spiritual, moral, or other abstract meanings through the actions of fictional characters that serve as symbols.
2. an allegorical or figurative narrative, poem, or the like: the allegory of Piers Plowman.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin allēgoria < Greek allēgoría, derivative of allēgoreîn to speak so as to imply something other = all- all- + -ēgorein to speak (see category)]

allegory

an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n.allegorical, adj.
See also: Representation
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Art
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Literature

allegory

A form in which the action and other elements stand for something else in real life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Aesop's fables - a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
2.allegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract ideaallegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract idea
symbolic representation, symbolisation, symbolization, symbol - something visible that by association or convention represents something else that is invisible; "the eagle is a symbol of the United States"
scarlet letter - the letter A in red; Puritans required adulterers to wear it
cupid - a symbol for love in the form of a cherubic naked boy with wings and a bow and arrow
donkey - the symbol of the Democratic Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
dove - an emblem of peace
eagle - an emblem representing power; "the Roman eagle"
elephant - the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
fasces - bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade protruding; in ancient Rome it was a symbol of a magistrate's power; in modern Italy it is a symbol of fascism
national flag, ensign - an emblem flown as a symbol of nationality
hammer and sickle - the emblem on the flag of the Soviet Union
red flag - the emblem of socialist revolution
Magen David, Mogen David, Shield of David, Solomon's seal, Star of David - a six-pointed star formed from two equilateral triangles; an emblem symbolizing Judaism
badge - an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.); "they checked everyone's badge before letting them in"
Agnus Dei, Paschal Lamb - figure of a lamb; emblematic of Christ
maple-leaf - the emblem of Canada
medallion - an emblem indicating that a taxicab is registered
spread eagle - an emblem (an eagle with wings and legs spread) on the obverse of the Great Seal of the United States
Hakenkreuz, swastika - the official emblem of the Nazi Party and the Third Reich; a cross with the arms bent at right angles in a clockwise direction
3.allegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblancesallegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"

allegory

noun symbol, story, tale, myth, symbolism, emblem, fable, parable, apologue The book is a kind of allegory of the country's history.
Translations
alegoriejinotaj
allegoriavertauskuva

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] Nalegoría f

allegory

[ˈælɪgəri] nallégorie f
an allegory of sth → une allégorie de qch

allegory

nAllegorie f

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] nallegoria
References in classic literature ?
Zarathustra, then,--this shadowy, allegorical personality, speaking in allegories and parables, and at times not even refraining from relating his own dreams--is a figure we can understand but very imperfectly if we have no knowledge of his creator and counterpart, Friedrich Nietzsche; and it were therefore well, previous to our study of the more abstruse parts of this book, if we were to turn to some authoritative book on Nietzsche's life and works and to read all that is there said on the subject.
Then he was again led somewhere still blindfold, and as they went along he was told allegories of the toils of his pilgrimage, of holy friendship, of the Eternal Architect of the universe, and of the courage with which he should endure toils and dangers.
Nevertheless, in that throng, upon which the four allegories vied with each other in pouring out floods of metaphors, there was no ear more attentive, no heart that palpitated more, not an eye was more haggard, no neck more outstretched, than the eye, the ear, the neck, and the heart of the author, of the poet, of that brave Pierre Gringoire, who had not been able to resist, a moment before, the joy of telling his name to two pretty girls.
Hayward led them into a large, long room, dingily magnificent, with huge pictures on the walls of nude women: they were vast allegories of the school of Haydon; but smoke, gas, and the London atmosphere had given them a richness which made them look like old masters.
I must have told the boys stories out of my Goldsmith's Greece and Rome, or it would not have been known that I had read them, but I have no recollection now of doing so, while I distinctly remember rehearsing the allegories and fables of the 'Gesta Romanorum', a book which seems to have been in my hands about the same time or a little later.
This study argues that three of ThackerayAEs novels--Vanity Fair, Pendennis, and The Newcomes--are actually Christian allegories and compares ThackerayAEs beliefs on individualism to the beliefs of other Victorian writers, including Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and Charlotte Bronti.
There is a reason that allegories have endured as a narrative device and will continue to stay relevant to storytellers and filmmakers in the future.
Material Difference: Modernism and the Allegories of Discourse.
In fact, the case could be made that landscape allegories are a viewer-generated genre unto themselves.
Some specific ideas considered include the textual aspects of allegory, the agent as daemon, allegory and ritual, psychoanalytic theory and the mental basis of allegory, and anthropological concepts of sympathetic magic to explain the causal sequences underlying events in allegories.
With reference to "The Woman At the Washington Zoo" "The Bronze David of Donatello" and one of his final poems, "The Tree," I sug-gest that Jariell'S metamorphic allegories serve well as evidence for the processes (and not solely the products) of philosophical inquiry.
Some of the twenty-first-century national allegories appearing in this context are the work of third-generation authors in exile.