allegory


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Related to allegory: allusion, Allegory of the cave

al·le·go·ry

 (ăl′ĭ-gôr′ē)
n. pl. al·le·go·ries
1.
a. The representation of abstract ideas or principles by characters, figures, or events in narrative, dramatic, or pictorial form.
b. A story, picture, or play employing such representation. John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick are allegories.
2. A symbolic representation: The blindfolded figure with scales is an allegory of justice.

[Middle English allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein, to interpret allegorically : allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots + agoreuein, to speak publicly (from agorā, marketplace; see ger- in Indo-European roots).]

al′le·go′rist n.

allegory

(ˈælɪɡərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
2. (Art Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
4. (Art Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
6. (Art Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
7. anything used as a symbol or emblem
[C14: from Old French allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein to speak figuratively, from allos other + agoreuein to make a speech in public, from agora a public gathering]
ˈallegorist n

al•le•go•ry

(ˈæl əˌgɔr i, -ˌgoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the representation of spiritual, moral, or other abstract meanings through the actions of fictional characters that serve as symbols.
2. an allegorical or figurative narrative, poem, or the like: the allegory of Piers Plowman.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin allēgoria < Greek allēgoría, derivative of allēgoreîn to speak so as to imply something other = all- all- + -ēgorein to speak (see category)]

allegory

an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n.allegorical, adj.
See also: Representation
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Art
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Literature

allegory

A form in which the action and other elements stand for something else in real life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Aesop's fables - a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
2.allegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract ideaallegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract idea
symbolic representation, symbolisation, symbolization, symbol - something visible that by association or convention represents something else that is invisible; "the eagle is a symbol of the United States"
scarlet letter - the letter A in red; Puritans required adulterers to wear it
cupid - a symbol for love in the form of a cherubic naked boy with wings and a bow and arrow
donkey - the symbol of the Democratic Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
dove - an emblem of peace
eagle - an emblem representing power; "the Roman eagle"
elephant - the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
fasces - bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade protruding; in ancient Rome it was a symbol of a magistrate's power; in modern Italy it is a symbol of fascism
national flag, ensign - an emblem flown as a symbol of nationality
hammer and sickle - the emblem on the flag of the Soviet Union
red flag - the emblem of socialist revolution
Magen David, Mogen David, Shield of David, Solomon's seal, Star of David - a six-pointed star formed from two equilateral triangles; an emblem symbolizing Judaism
badge - an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.); "they checked everyone's badge before letting them in"
Agnus Dei, Paschal Lamb - figure of a lamb; emblematic of Christ
maple-leaf - the emblem of Canada
medallion - an emblem indicating that a taxicab is registered
spread eagle - an emblem (an eagle with wings and legs spread) on the obverse of the Great Seal of the United States
Hakenkreuz, swastika - the official emblem of the Nazi Party and the Third Reich; a cross with the arms bent at right angles in a clockwise direction
3.allegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblancesallegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"

allegory

noun symbol, story, tale, myth, symbolism, emblem, fable, parable, apologue The book is a kind of allegory of the country's history.
Translations
alegoriejinotaj
allegoriavertauskuva

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] Nalegoría f

allegory

[ˈælɪgəri] nallégorie f
an allegory of sth → une allégorie de qch

allegory

nAllegorie f

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] nallegoria
References in classic literature ?
Her eyes blazed up, and she jumped for him like a wild-cat, and when she was done with him she was rags and he wasn't anything but an allegory. That was most undoubtedly the other twin, you see, coming to the front.
"What happened after she had converted the boy into an allegory?"
365-427), whose exquisite allegory "The Peach Blossom Fountain" is quoted by Professor Giles in his `Chinese Literature'.
But its roomy staircases, passages, and antechambers still remain; and even its painted ceilings, where Allegory, in Roman helmet and celestial linen, sprawls among balustrades and pillars, flowers, clouds, and big-legged boys, and makes the head ache--as would seem to be Allegory's object always, more or less.
Here, beneath the painted ceiling, with foreshortened Allegory staring down at his intrusion as if it meant to swoop upon him, and he cutting it dead, Mr.
A real element of Socratic teaching, which is more prominent in the Republic than in any of the other Dialogues of Plato, is the use of example and illustration ('taphorhtika auto prhospherhontez'): "Let us apply the test of common instances." "You," says Adeimantus, ironically, in the sixth book, "are so unaccustomed to speak in images." And this use of examples or images, though truly Socratic in origin, is enlarged by the genius of Plato into the form of an allegory or parable, which embodies in the concrete what has been already described, or is about to be described, in the abstract.
Chaucer experimented with the numerous lyric forms which the French poets had brought to perfection; he also translated, in whole or in part, the most important of medieval French narrative poems, the thirteenth century 'Romance of the Rose' of Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meung, a very clever satirical allegory, in many thousand lines, of medieval love and medieval religion.
I declare that this bold metaphor is admirable, and that the natural history of the theatre, on a day of allegory and royal marriage songs, is not in the least startled by a dolphin who is the son of a lion.
"To continue the allegory, Prince," she answered, passing on to the next table, "also with poisonous berries.
"Let me show you the figures upon them, and I will tell you the allegory."
It is an allegory, and in writing it Langland wished to hold up to scorn all the wickedness that he saw around him, and sharply to point out many causes of misery.
And although the literal, sensual Song thrives in modernity, allegory has not disappeared.