allelomorph


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Related to allelomorph: Alleles

al·le·lo·morph

 (ə-lē′lə-môrf′, ə-lĕl′ə-)
n.
1. A distinct phenotype associated with a specific allele.
2. See allele.

[Greek allēlōn, mutually (from allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots) + -morph.]

al·le′lo·mor′phic adj.
al·le′lo·mor′phism n.

allelomorph

(əˈliːləˌmɔːf)
n
(Genetics) genetics another term for allele

al•lele

(əˈlil)

n.
one of two or more alternative forms of a gene occupying the same position on matching chromosomes: an individual normally has two alleles for each trait, one from either parent.
[1930–35; < German Allel, appar. as shortening of German equivalents of allelomorph or allelomorphic gene]
al•lel•ic (əˈli lɪk, əˈlɛl ɪk) adj.
al•lel′ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allelomorph - (genetics) either of a pair (or series) of alternative forms of a gene that can occupy the same locus on a particular chromosome and that control the same characterallelomorph - (genetics) either of a pair (or series) of alternative forms of a gene that can occupy the same locus on a particular chromosome and that control the same character; "some alleles are dominant over others"
cistron, gene, factor - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"
dominant allele, dominant - an allele that produces the same phenotype whether its paired allele is identical or different
recessive, recessive allele - an allele that produces its characteristic phenotype only when its paired allele is identical
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
References in periodicals archive ?
Also called allelomorph) of the 5-HTTLPR gene smiled or laughed more when looking at funny comics or amusing film clips, compared to those with long versions of the gene.
Since the term allopathy already existed in the literature, contrasted with homeopathy, he coined the term "allelopathy." This term, however, proved equally confusing because of its similarity to genetic terms such as "allelomorph" or "allele." Ultimately, it is more important to identify the role of the allelochemical in community structure rather than debating whether, or not, the phenomenon can be technically identified as "allelopathy."
Epistatic--Designating a condition of genetics in which one factor prevents a factor other than its allelomorph from exhibiting its normal effect on the development of the individual.