allness

allness

(ˈɔːlnəs)
n
the state of being comprehensive or all-embracing
References in periodicals archive ?
Panic is the experience of feeling completely overwhelmed as the sudden "allness" of an experience breaks on us and throws us off our feet.
The result of this attempt to be faithful to 'reality' was an increased emphasis upon objects, in and for themselves, in the belief that they represent 'nature.' Thus, European art became an art of content, or subject matter, dominated by an attitude of 'allness' resulting from the identification of the artist's particular level of abstraction with 'reality.'
(39) In this text, Being is speaking as if she is "a being." This integral being (Sophia, wisdom) speaks from the paradoxical perspective of Allness (completeness rather than consistency).
Broomfield argues that Beckett's work is not nihilistic and that language as being is "allness." He states that Waiting for Godot is an example of Beckett's work that shows how language can free itself from perceptions, which cannot be proven to exist and in this way, represents "a heightened stage of linguistic consciousness" (25).
After imagining Whitman creating this kind of merged identity with an Eskimo, Lawrence writes, "when Walt blandly assumed Allness, including Eskimoness, unto himself, he was just sucking the wind out of a blown egg-shell, no more.
(40) He thus begins from "[a]n Allness that in its Unity is the causative principle of its comprehended distinctions" (15:313).
In the earlier description from the essay, there is a focus on aspects of panophilia evident in Lawrence's perception of the tree, variously describing it as a "guardian spirit," with a "powerful will of its own"; similar to the eternal vestiges of Pan that have survived into the modern era, it "is always there, alive and changeless, alive and changing," with an "aura of life," and "still within the allness of Pan [...] [it] is a tree, which is still Pan" (157, 158).
It is simply the noumenal All and All-in-All, as well as the first eidetic-archetypal Singularity, with or without phenomenological "allness" (reflexive enclosure);
"We believe that's what we don't need to do; God already has created perfection, and we pray in order to experience the 'allness' of that creation, and to be part of that universe.
In our era of "enemy combatants," the difference is subtle but important: although many of his officers disagreed, Mexican General Santa Anna saw those killed at Goliad as pirates rather than soldiers and hence not technically "prisoners of war" at all.32 It is fitting that the category-challenging events of Goliad attracted the attention of America's poet of unity, identity, and "allness," and it is intriguing to consider that it could have been a report from a Mexican witness to this "day of most heartfelt sorrow" that brought its occurrences so powerfully to Whitman's mind as he sought a new American voice with which to chant his masterwork, whether that witness actually existed or not.
Mary Baker Eddy, who founded Christian Science, saw the closet as "this quiet sanctuary of earnest longings", where "we must deny sin and plead God's allness".
A poem is an attempt to express what Lee calls "allness," another name for God.