allograft

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Related to allogeneic graft: autologous graft, syngeneic graft

al·lo·graft

 (ăl′ə-grăft′)
n.
A tissue or organ graft between genetically different individuals of the same species, as between two humans. Also called homograft.

al′lo·graft′ v.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

allograft

(ˈæləʊˌɡrɑːft)
n
(Medicine) a tissue graft from a donor genetically unrelated to the recipient
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•lo•graft

(ˈæl əˌgræft, -ˌgrɑft)

n.
a tissue or organ obtained from one member of a species and grafted to a genetically dissimilar member of the same species. Also called homograft.
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allograft - tissue or organ transplanted from a donor of the same species but different genetic makeupallograft - tissue or organ transplanted from a donor of the same species but different genetic makeup; recipient's immune system must be suppressed to prevent rejection of the graft
graft, transplant - (surgery) tissue or organ transplanted from a donor to a recipient; in some cases the patient can be both donor and recipient
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

al·lo·graft

n. aloinjerto. V.: homograft.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

allograft

n aloinjerto
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The incidence varied from 21% to 25% in allogeneic graft recipients to 5% in auto-HSCT (42,43).
As such, they are considered an allogeneic graft, which typically requires immunosuppression in order for the recipient to tolerate the implant.
The risk of HIV transmission in screened and tested donors is estimated to be 1 in 1.6 million, with only 1 report of disease transmission from an allogeneic graft, which occurred prior to the screening standards instituted in 1985.