allusion


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al·lu·sion

 (ə-lo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act of alluding; indirect reference: Without naming names, the candidate criticized the national leaders by allusion.
2. An instance of indirect reference: an allusion to classical mythology in a poem.

[Late Latin allūsiō, allūsiōn-, a playing with, from Latin allūsus, past participle of allūdere, to play with; see allude.]

allusion

(əˈluːʒən)
n
1. the act of alluding
2. a passing reference; oblique or obscure mention
[C16: from Late Latin allūsiō, from Latin allūdere to sport with, allude]

al•lu•sion

(əˈlu ʒən)

n.
1. a passing or casual reference to something, either directly or implied: an allusion to Shakespeare.
2. the act of alluding.
[1540–50; < Late Latin allūsiō <allūd(ere) (see allude)]

allusion

Reference, especially when this is indirect or passing, to something else.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allusion - passing reference or indirect mention
mention, reference - a remark that calls attention to something or someone; "she made frequent mention of her promotion"; "there was no mention of it"; "the speaker made several references to his wife"

allusion

noun reference, mention, suggestion, hint, implication, innuendo, intimation, insinuation, casual remark, indirect reference This remark was an allusion to their longstanding hostility.
Translations
تَلْمِيح، إشارَة ضِمْنِيَّه
narážkazmínka
hentydning
lausleg eîa óbein tilvitnun til
değinmeima

allusion

[əˈluːʒən] Nalusión f, referencia f

allusion

[əˈluːʒən] nallusion f
a literary allusion → une allusion littéraire
an historical allusion → une allusion historique
an allusion to sth → une allusion à qch
to make an allusion to sth → faire une allusion à qch

allusion

nAnspielung f (→ to auf +acc)

allusion

[əˈluːʒn] naccenno, allusione f (Literature) → riferimento

allude

(əˈluːd) verb
(with to) to mention. He did not allude to the remarks made by the previous speaker.
alˈlusion (-ʒən) noun
(the act of making) a mention or reference. The prime minister made no allusion to the war in his speech.
References in classic literature ?
He then remounted his feet, ascended to the pulpit, and resumed his discourse, making no allusion to the incident.
There is no reason to suppose that any of the Dialogues of Plato were written before the death of Socrates; the Meno, which appears to be one of the earliest of them, is proved to have been of a later date by the allusion of Anytus.
Even the vexation consequent upon his recent adventure had vanished from his mind; and he could join in the hearty laughter, which any allusion to it excited in Mr.
I am thinking, madame, of the allusion made by that insolent gentleman, whom you have caused to be arrested, to the Duke of Buckingham -- to him whom you allowed to be assassinated -- to the Duchess de Chevreuse, whom you suffered to be exiled -- to the Duc de Beaufort, whom you imprisoned; but if he made allusion to me it was because he is ignorant of the relation in which I stand to you.
Casaubon," said Lady Chettam, in her stateliest way, "you do not, I hope, think there was any allusion to you in my mentioning Mrs.
Then, if the boy has read a good many other books, he is taken with that abundance of literary turn and allusion in Thackeray; there is hardly a sentence but reminds him that he is in the society of a great literary swell, who has read everything, and can mock or burlesque life right and left from the literature always at his command.
I abstained from entering into particulars for Magdalen's sake, and I made no allusion to that letter of Mrs.
Ellmother's doubtful prospects, and to Francine's strange allusion to her life in the West Indies, but for the arrival of two letters by the afternoon post.
From his brother Lysias we learn that he fell a victim to the Thirty Tyrants, but no allusion is here made to his fate, nor to the circumstance that Cephalus and his family were of Syracusan origin, and had migrated from Thurii to Athens.
But the populace, seeing in that title an allusion damaging to Barbicane's project, broke into the auditorium, smashed the benches, and compelled the unlucky director to alter his playbill.
The allusion and metaphor we have here made use of, we must acknowledge to be infinitely too great for our occasion; but there is, indeed, no other, which is at all adequate to express the difference between an author of the first rate and a critic of the lowest.
I liked to think that this was a subtle allusion to the rapture she had known in the society of Jeffrey Aspern--though it was true that such an allusion would have accorded ill with the wish I imputed to her to keep him buried in her soul.