alluvium


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al·lu·vi·um

 (ə-lo͞o′vē-əm)
n. pl. al·lu·vi·ums or al·lu·vi·a (-vē-ə)
Sediment deposited by flowing water, as in a riverbed, flood plain, or delta. Also called alluvion.

[Medieval Latin, flood, from neuter of Latin alluvius, alluvial, from alluere, to wash against; see alluvion.]

alluvium

(əˈluːvɪəm)
n, pl -viums or -via (-vɪə)
(Geological Science) a fine-grained fertile soil consisting of mud, silt, and sand deposited by flowing water on flood plains, in river beds, and in estuaries
[C17: from Latin; see alluvion]

al•lu•vi•um

(əˈlu vi əm)

n., pl. -vi•ums, -vi•a (-vi ə)
1. a deposit of sand, mud, etc., formed by flowing water.
2. the sedimentary matter deposited thus within recent times, esp. in the valleys of large rivers.
[1655–65; < Latin, n. use of neuter of alluvius washed against]

al·lu·vi·um

(ə-lo͞o′vē-əm)
Sand, silt, mud, or other matter deposited by flowing water, as in a riverbed, floodplain, or delta.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alluvium - clay or silt or gravel carried by rushing streams and deposited where the stream slows downalluvium - clay or silt or gravel carried by rushing streams and deposited where the stream slows down
delta - a low triangular area of alluvial deposits where a river divides before entering a larger body of water; "the Mississippi River delta"; "the Nile delta"
placer - an alluvial deposit that contains particles of some valuable mineral
sediment, deposit - matter that has been deposited by some natural process
alluvial soil - a fine-grained fertile soil deposited by water flowing over flood plains or in river beds
Translations

alluvium

[əˈluːvɪəm] N (alluviums, alluvia (pl)) → aluvión m, depósito m aluvial

alluvium

[əˈluːviəm] nalluvions fplall-weather [ˌɔːlˈwɛðər] modif [track, surface, pitch] → tous temps; [racing, hurdling] → tous temps; [tyres] → tous temps

alluvium

nAnschwemmung f

alluvium

[əˈluːvɪəm] nmateriale m alluvionale
References in classic literature ?
The foundation of their airy castles lay already before them in the strip of rich alluvium on the river bank, where the North Fork, sharply curving round the base of Devil's Spur, had for centuries swept the detritus of gulch and canyon.
Each wave of time contributes its alluvium, each race deposits its layer on the monument, each individual brings his stone.
It is, however, a remarkable coincidence, that in the two large islands cut off by the Beagle Channel from the rest of Tierra del Fuego, one has cliffs composed of matter that may be called stratified alluvium, which front similar ones on the opposite side of the channel, -- while the other is exclusively bordered by old crystalline rocks: in the former, called Navarin Island, both foxes and guanacos occur; but in the latter, Hoste Island, although similar in every respect, and only separated by a channel a little more than half a mile wide, I have the word of Jemmy Button for saying that neither of these animals are found.
The Quaternary is characterised by alluvium and an alluvium cone consisting of detrical material that comes from north and south with the flood waters.
We estimate the rate of organic carbon storage in post-settlement alluvium since 1963-1964, in eastern Ottawa County, Michigan using laboratory methods and cesium-137 dating.
Quaternary age deposits cover most of Al-Ain area and consist of near surface and surficial sediments of mixed alluvial, aeolian, and locally, sabkha (evaporatic origin) Quaternary alluvium constitutes the principle waterbearing litho-stratigraphic unit.
This zone is traceable for over 30km as discrete anomalies variously determined from soil, auger and vacuum programmes separated by areas of either alluvium or areas of no sampling.
It seems most likely that the drainage variation is related to variations in the permeability profile (probably associated with textural differences) of the initial alluvium.
Most New Zealand vineyards (68%) are located, in general, on alluvium and aggradation gravels (Fig.
Archaeological remains within river valleys are often exceptionally well preserved through a combination of the presence of high water tables, stable terrace surfaces and substantial depths of alluvium (Brown 1997; Howard et al.
Local gravel resources may exist only in stream bars and alluvium.