almain


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almain

(ˈælmeɪn)
n
a Germanthe German languagea German dance, the Allemande
adj
German
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References in classic literature ?
Then their talk turned to minstrelsy, and the stranger knight drew forth a cittern, upon which he played the minne-lieder of the north, singing the while in a high cracked voice of Hildebrand and Brunhild and Siegfried, and all the strength and beauty of the land of Almain.
Vectans Pharma was advised by Raphael Financial Advisory represented by Benoit Perrin d'Arloz and by the Almain Law Firm represented by Edgard Nguyen (partner).
Guy de Montfort dio muerte con sus propias manos y su propia espada a Enrique de Almain.
The Famous History of Palmendos, Son to the Most Renowned Palmerin D'Oliva, Emperour of Constantinople, and the Heroick Queen of Tharsus wherein is likewise a Most Pleasant Discourse of Prince Rifarano, the Son of Trineus, Emperour of Almain and Aurecinda, Sister to the Soldane of Persia.
Almain used Ockham but moved towards conciliarism, whereas Ockham had denied ecclesiastical authority in favour of a correct understanding of fundamental texts.
Iago replies: "Why, he drinks you with facility your Dane dead drunk; he sweats not to overthrow your Almain.
Apparently much influenced by the thought of John Buridan and William of Ockham in terms of his moral theory, Almain claims in his Moralia that the voluntary is an act or a failure to act that abides in the power of the agent when all the required conditions for acting are present such that it is in the power of the agent to act or not.
42) In Vitoria's Commentaruim in Secundam Secundae (1535) there is a plethora of references to either Duns Scotus or nominalist authors such as William of Ockham, Gabriel Biel, Jacques Almain, and John Mair; and he is straightforward in demonstrating how often many of the ideas set forth by these authors are actually in harmony with Thomistic doctrine, or even the extent to which he prefers these over those of Aquinas.
11) Editors since Steevens have typically glossed the word upspring with reference to The Tragedy of Alphonsus, Emperour of Germany (London, 1654; Wing C1952), attributed to George Chapman, in which Bohemia explains, 'We Germans have no changes in our dances, / An Almain and an upspring that is all' (F1r).
Entre los autores espanoles destacaban Gaspar Lax, Juan de Celaya y Fernando de Enzinas, sin contar los de otro origen: Jacques Almain, Jean Dullaert y George Lokert.
Curiosity drives Iris--Thompson's central protagonist from whose perspective events unfold--into Glen Almain.