alms


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alms

 (ämz)
pl.n.
Money or goods given as charity to the poor.

[Middle English almes, from Old English ælmesse, from Late Latin eleēmosyna, from Greek eleēmosunē, pity, charity, from eleēmōn, pitiful, from eleos, pity.]

alms

(ɑːmz)
pl n
charitable donations of money or goods to the poor or needy
[Old English ælmysse, from Late Latin eleēmosyna, from Greek eleēmosunē pity; see eleemosynary]

alms

(ɑmz)

n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
money, food, or other donations given to the poor or needy.
[before 1000; Middle English almes, almesse, Old English ælmesse « Late Latin elēmosynae (pl.) charity, alms; see eleemosynary]

alms

- Goes back to Greek eleemosune, "compassion, pity," and eleos, "mercy."
See also related terms for pity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alms - money or goods contributed to the pooralms - money or goods contributed to the poor
donation, contribution - act of giving in common with others for a common purpose especially to a charity
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one

alms

plural noun (Old-fashioned) donation, relief, gift, charity, bounty, benefaction Alms were distributed to those in need.

alms

noun
Something given to a charity or cause:
Translations
صَدَقَه، صَدَقَات
almužna
almisse
ölmusa
išmalda
žēlastības dāvana

alms

[ɑːmz] NPLlimosna fsing

alms

[ˈɑːmz] naumône f

alms

plAlmosen pl

alms

:
alms box
nAlmosenstock m
almshouse
nArmenhaus nt

alms

[ɑːmz] npl (old) → elemosina sg
to give alms → fare l'elemosina

alms

(aːmz) noun plural
money etc given to the poor.
References in classic literature ?
Those," he said, "came nearer to the Scripture meaning, who understood by it candour, or the forming of a benevolent opinion of our brethren, and passing a favourable judgment on their actions; a virtue much higher, and more extensive in its nature, than a pitiful distribution of alms, which, though we would never so much prejudice, or even ruin our families, could never reach many; whereas charity, in the other and truer sense, might be extended to all mankind.
Thirty thousand crowns in alms is not given, as you have done for the last six months, out of pure Christian charity; that would be too grand.
A tattered mendicant, who could not collect any coins, lost as he was in the midst of the crowd, and who had not probably found sufficient indemnity in the pockets of his neighbors, had hit upon the idea of perching himself upon some conspicuous point, in order to attract looks and alms.
The inclination to goodness, is imprinted deeply in the nature of man; insomuch, that if it issue not towards men, it will take unto other living creatures; as it is seen in the Turks, a cruel people, who nevertheless are kind to beasts, and give alms, to dogs and birds; insomuch, as Busbechius reporteth, a Christian boy, in Constantinople, had like to have been stoned, for gagging in a waggishness a long-billed fowl.
Toilsomely did my spirit mount stairs, and cautiously; alms of delight were its refreshment; on the staff did life creep along with the blind one.
Is this the still militant old man, standing at the corners of the three kingdoms, on all hands coercing alms of beggars?
Passepartout jumped off the box and followed his master, who, after paying the cabman, was about to enter the station, when a poor beggar-woman, with a child in her arms, her naked feet smeared with mud, her head covered with a wretched bonnet, from which hung a tattered feather, and her shoulders shrouded in a ragged shawl, approached, and mournfully asked for alms.
To beg alms he would be ashamed; and, moreover, he works for the benefit of mankind just as does a factory machine.
They had not taken a hundred steps when they saw two rough-looking individuals sitting on a stone begging for alms.
Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun.
He gave presents to his friends, and large alms to the poor.
It is true that this people has a natural disposition to goodness; they are very liberal of their alms, they much frequent their churches, and are very studious to adorn them; they practise fasting and other mortifications, and notwithstanding their separation from the Roman Church, and the corruptions which have crept into their faith, yet retain in a great measure the devout fervour of the primitive Christians.