alpha ray


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Related to alpha ray: beta ray

alpha ray

n.
1. A rapidly moving alpha particle.
2. A narrow beam of such particles.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

alpha ray

n
(General Physics) ionizing radiation consisting of a stream of alpha particles
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al′pha ray`


n.
a stream of alpha particles. Also called al′pha radia`tion.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

alpha ray

A stream of alpha particles.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alpha ray - the radiation of alpha particles during radioactive decayalpha ray - the radiation of alpha particles during radioactive decay
ionizing radiation - high-energy radiation capable of producing ionization in substances through which it passes
corpuscular radiation, particulate radiation - a stream of atomic or subatomic particles that may be charged positively (e.g. alpha particles) or negatively (e.g. beta particles) or not at all (e.g. neutrons)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1st winner of the Car-a-thon won a 42 inch LED TV, the 2nd & 3rd winner took home a Yamaha Alpha Ray bike.
For example, the reader learns that Americium-241 is a radioactive element and an alpha ray emitter with a half-life of 432.7 years.
Similarly, [.sup.218]Po, a first generation decay product with a short half-life (3.1 minutes), was taken as the measuring object for alpha rays ([alpha]-rays).
Very methodically he began to study the properties of the alpha rays (helium nuclei), emanating from the decay of the radium, using his own specially designed apparatus.