alpha-linolenic acid


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

alpha-linolenic acid

n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for linolenic acid
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alpha-linolenic acid - a polyunsaturated fatty acid with 18 carbon atoms; the only omega-3 fatty acid found in vegetable products; it is most abundant in canola oil; a fatty acid essential for nutrition
omega-3, omega-3 fatty acid - a polyunsaturated fatty acid whose carbon chain has its first double valence bond three carbons from the beginning
References in periodicals archive ?
Walnuts are the only nuts which contain a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid; a plant-based omega-3 fatty acid required by the human body for normal growth and development," said Cardiologist, SRV Hospital, Dr.
A recent study revisits the question of alpha-linolenic acid's role in prostate cancer.
People in the control group were allowed to eat fish once a week, and the use of camelina oil or other oils containing alpha-linolenic acid was prohibited.
Although many different fatty acids have statistically significant relationships between these three groups, some seem to detach due to very low levels of alpha-linolenic acid in either the control or the inaugural diabetes group.
There is even an old medical school mnemonic device that addresses this: "Len is your friend," meaning alpha-linolenic acid is anti-inflammatory, while linoleic acid has a more complicated relationship with the body.
Editor's Note: "We also found that higher dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in vegetable oils and nuts, is associated with lower ALS risk," Kathryn Fitzgerald added.
Primary disease-fighting compounds In walnuts and flaxseeds: plant-derived omega-3 fatty add: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) * nonfiavonoid polyphenol antioxidants: ellagic acid and gallic acid * arginine * vitamin E
NEW YORK -- Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a plant-based omega-3 fatty acid, has been linked to a lower risk of cardiovascular diseases, particularly coronary heart disease.
Flaxseed and its derivatives, flaxseed oil and linseed oil, are rich sources of the essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid, which is a biologic precursor to omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid.
Alpha-linolenic acid leads to a reduction in bone turnover, and a shift in the balance of bone degradation/formation toward formation.
Another source of omega-3 EFAs that is growing in popularity is flaxseed: it was flaxseed and other foods rich in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) that earned a reputation for healthy living in the past--and this recognition is being reawakened.
Although no association was found between reduced risk for depression and consumption offish containing high levels of eicos-apentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the researchers did find that plant-based omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA) had a positive effect on mood.