alpha-receptor


Also found in: Medical.

al·pha-re·cep·tor

(ăl′fə-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A site in the autonomic nervous system in which excitatory responses occur when adrenergic agents, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine, are released. Activation of alpha-receptors causes various physiological reactions, including the stimulation of associated muscles and the constriction of blood vessels. Also called alpha-adrenergic receptor.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are numerous classes of medications used to treat high blood pressure; they include diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), beta-receptor blockers, and alpha-receptor blockers.
A careful medication history should pay particular attention to identifying use of common offending medications including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective nor-adrenergic reuptake inhibitors, MAO inhibitors, caffeine, decongestants, narcotics, beta-blockers, alpha-receptor agents, diuretics, lipid-lowering agents, theophylline, and albuterol.
This supports the findings from Heijnen and co-workers stating that the patients requiring high doses of inotropes might lack an adequate TNF stimulus to maintain their adequate alpha-receptor homeostasis (6).
In severe type A individuals, chronic alpha-receptor stimulation is predominant, the researchers report.