alright


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alright

nonstandard for all right; often used in informal writing: I’m alright, thank you.
Not to be confused with:
all right – satisfactory; safe and sound: I’m feeling all right now.; expressing consent or assent: It is all right to leave the table.
all-right – acceptable: He’s an all-right kind of guy.

al·right

 (ôl-rīt′)
adv. Nonstandard
All right. See Usage Note at all right.

alright

(ɔːlˈraɪt)
adv, sentence substitute, adj
a variant spelling of all right
Usage: The form alright, though very common, is still considered by many people to be wrong or less acceptable than all right

all` right′


adv.
1. yes; very well: All right, I'll go with you.
2. (used as an interrogative) do you agree?: We'll meet tomorrow, all right?
3. satisfactorily; acceptably: Her work is coming along all right.
4. without fail; certainly: You'll hear about this, all right!
adj.
5. safe; sound: Are you all right?
6. acceptable; passable: His performance was all right.
7. reliable; good: That fellow is all right.
[1100–50]
usage: See alright.

all′-right`



adj.
very good; excellent: an all-right guy.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.alright - nonstandard usage
satisfactory - giving satisfaction; "satisfactory living conditions"; "his grades were satisfactory"
Adv.1.alright - without doubt (used to reinforce an assertion); "it's expensive all right"
2.alright - an expression of agreement normally occurring at the beginning of a sentence
3.alright - in a satisfactory or adequate manneralright - in a satisfactory or adequate manner; "she'll do okay on her own"; "held up all right under pressure"; (`alright' is a nonstandard variant of `all right')
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech

alright

see all right
Usage: The single-word form alright is still considered by many people to be wrong or less acceptable than all right. This is borne out by the data in the Bank of English, which suggests that the two-word form is about twenty times commoner than the alternative spelling.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
"But we'll be alright. We just need to get a wee bit of form together and we'll be absolutely fine.
The multifaceted Just Alright Doesnt Fly Here campaign will come to life in videos and ads that feature different aspects of JetBlues award-winning customer service.
The latest campaign-Just Alright Doesn't Fly Here-reminds travelers they don't have to accept the bare minimum that has become standard across the industry.
Launching today, its latest campaign, 'Just Alright Doesn't Fly Here,' takes a stand against mediocrity in air travel and reminds travelers they don't have to accept the bare minimum that has become standard across the industry.
Kairana (Uttar Pradesh) [India], Apr 10 (ANI): BJP leader Mriganka Singh, who is said to be 'upset' with the party over the denial of Lok Sabha ticket from Kairana, on Wednesday said that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has assured her that "everything will be alright" and there is "no need to worry."
"The older guy said,'It's my wee cousin, it's alright'.
After being a part of the more serious zombie TV series, Cudlitz said in an interview with (https://www.tvinsider.com/762474/michael-cudlitz-the-kids-are-alright-season-1-guest-stars-walking-dead/) TV Insider that he wanted to work in "something a little bit lighter." The project he chose was "The Kids Are Alright."
"All right" was still by far the dominant usage in 2000, when Google's study of published books was concluded, but "alright" was showing a slow but steady increase beginning around 1970, the same year Free's "All Right Now" hit the AM airwaves.
He became established as a television presenter in the 1970s, hosting Looks Familiar, the nostalgic chat show, before It'll be Alright On The Night hit the airwaves in 1977.
"Actually, broadly speaking, we rub along alright, it's the Birmingham way, we rub along fine.
Irritated Danny asked: "Yeah you alright - what you want to make one with me?"
I think most people of my generation (I am 69) will remember the Peter Sellers film 'I'm Alright Jack'.