altered chord


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altered chord

n
(Classical Music) music a chord in which one or more notes are chromatically changed by the introduction of accidentals
References in periodicals archive ?
During rehearsals, she noticed Benny giving her a funny look--a stare jazz musicians famously called "the ray." When Marian played an inversion or slightly altered chord, Benny would hunch up his shoulders "like he had been stabbed in the back," she said.
These gradually move to more complex terms including altered chord symbols.
I was impressed by the helpful practice steps and understandable explanations of topics including rootless voicings, using your ear to hear subtleties that can't be notated in the score, anticipation and altered chords.
Chapters 8--16 continue with advanced and altered chords, extended harmonies, stride, boogie-woogie and lead sheets.
"Words Like Freedom." C with shifting altered chords; [E.sub.3]-E[flat].sub.4]; Tess: mH; 4/4, Calm, innocent ([quarter note] = 84); V/M, P/M; 1 1/2 pages.
Brief, succinct chapters are presented on Keyboard Styles, Chords and Inversions, the Gospel Beat, Changing the Meter, Syncopation, Chord Progressions and Harmonic Color, and Altered Chords. Each chapter features partial musical examples of first the original hymn or song and the gospel-inflected re-imagining of it.
(1.) The Ray Noble composition "Cherokee" is a favorite jam session number for jazz musicians, in 1945 bebop genius Charlie Parker recorded "Koko," his composition based on the chord changes of "Cherokee." However, the melody and rhythm-line of "Koko" are totally different from those of "Cherokee." The technique of using a pre-existing composition's harmonic base, sometimes with altered chords, as a foundation for a completely different musical composition is a hallmark of the bebop era.
Harmony, Advanced, delves into modal mixtures, German 6ths, chromatically altered chords as well as chords related by a chromatic 3rd, numerous other chord types.
143), distinct from our usual binary between diatonic and altered chords. This model would recognize metal's prevalent use of harmonies with high degrees of sounding consonance, even when such structures as played seem nondiatonic, and the relative lack of harmonies with high degrees of sounding dissonance, even when such structures as played would fit within the prevailing mode.
The innovations of "free improvisation," the pushing against the boundaries of popular music through the development of new and difficult forms--"faster tempos, altered chords, and harmonies that involved greater speeds" (Albert 179-80)--are clearly reflected in Parks's dramaturgy, just as Louis Armstrong's talking and singing paralleled his "phrasing and projection of tone on the trumpet" (Suhor 136).
Altered chords (Neapolitan sixth, augmented sixths) are not introduced.
Cope includes consideration of traditional tonal techniques such as modulation and altered chords and their effects in a polytonal environment.