alternant

(redirected from alternants)

alternant

(ɔːlˈtɜːnənt)
adj
alternating
[C17: from French, from Latin alternāre to alternate]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
We demonstrated that [tau]-functions can be expanded in terms of special determinants called alternants [16].
An important point is that the factor [V.sub.n]([q.sub.1],[q.sub.2],...,[q.sub.n]) can be separated from any nth-order alternant. Indeed, the argument [q.sub.n] may only appear in the nth row of Eq.
Be that as it may, in a restricted Szepe-style description, both stem alternants show the effect of having undergone rule (2):
In principle, the distribution of stem alternants would be explained--if at all--in terms of lexical rules.
Each of the indicative endings has three of these sex-and number-marking alternants, tentatively referred to as feminine, singular, and plural forms.
(5) Hence it may be hoped that a fuller understanding of the variants of-BA will clarify the usage of analogous alternants of the other, less frequent indicative endings.
Class I (Bi-alternant stems), Class II (Tri-alternant stems), and Class III (Stems with four vowel alternants).
The number of ablaut alternants in the prefixed strong preterite forms Number of ablaut alternants Tykes Tokens Class I Bi-alternant steins /[??]:w/ ~ /e:w/ ~ /e:w/ ~ /[??]:w/ 1 1 Class 11 Tri-alternant stems /i/ ~ /a/ ~ /u/ ~ /u/ 1 2 /i:/ ~ /[??]:/ ~ /u:/ ~ /u:/ 3 10 /[epsilon]:/ ~ /a/ ~ /ae:/ ~ /[epsilon]:/ 1 1 Class III Stems with four vowel alternants /o:/ ~ /a ~ aw/ ~ /[epsilon]:w/ ~ /e:w/ 2 18 /u/ ~ /a/ ~ /u/ ~ /o/ 2 2 Table 7.
First, as will be seen in the following sections most of the suffixes have what appear to be complex alternants. For example, -n'ik has what appears to be an alternant -'atn'ik in the derivation los' 'elk' > los'atn'ik 'elk hunter'.
Most of the denominal plural suffixes in Table 3 appear to have complex alternants. For example, -sc'ik has the alternant -ovsc'ik in the personal noun lesovsc'ik 'forester', -n'ik has the alternant -'atn'ik, and -ec has the alternant -ovec.
Old English hebban, however, is preserved with the reversed distribution of alternants: the voiceless consonant generalised in the preterite and the voiced one in the present system, consequently without a trace of the original alternation: hebban : hof : hofon : hafen, hoefen.
As already remarked, Old English verbs do not seem to preserve reflexes of Proto-Germanic *-iiV- and *-iV- alternants superficially.