edema

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Related to alveolar edema: cardiac tamponade, pulmonary edema

e·de·ma

also oe·de·ma (ĭ-dē′mə)
n. pl. e·de·mas or e·de·ma·ta (-mə-tə) also oe·de·mas or oe·de·ma·ta
1. Medicine An excessive accumulation of serous fluid in tissue spaces or a body cavity.
2. Botany A condition of plants characterized by blisterlike swellings on the leaves or other parts, caused by an accumulation of water.

[Middle English ydema, from Greek oidēma, a swelling, from oidein, to swell.]

e·dem′a·tous (ĭ-dĕm′ə-təs) adj.

edema

(ɪˈdiːmə)
n, pl -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) the usual US spelling of oedema
edematous, eˈdemaˌtose adj

e•de•ma

(ɪˈdi mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1. an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the tissue spaces, cavities, or joint capsules of the body, causing swelling of the area.
2. a similar swelling in plants caused by excessive moisture.
[1490–1500; < New Latin oedēma < Greek oídēma a swelling =oidē-, variant s. of oideîn to swell + -ma n. suffix]
e•dem•a•tous (ɪˈdɛm ə təs, ɪˈdi mə-) e•dem′a•tose (-ˌtoʊs) adj.

e·de·ma

(ĭ-dē′mə)
An excessive accumulation of fluid in body tissue that results in swelling.

edema

abnormal collecting of fluids in the cells, tissues, and other parts of the body, causing swelling. — edematous, edematose, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness

edema

An abnormal increase in interstitial fluid, resulting in swollen tissues.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.edema - swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid in cells, tissues, or serous cavitiesedema - swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid in cells, tissues, or serous cavities
angioedema, atrophedema, giant hives, periodic edema, Quincke's edema - recurrent large circumscribed areas of subcutaneous edema; onset is sudden and it disappears within 24 hours; seen mainly in young women, often as an allergic reaction to food or drugs
lymphedema - swelling (usually in the legs) caused by lymph accumulating in the tissues in the affected areas
scleredema - a skin disease marked by hard edema of the tissue usually beginning in the face
cystoid macular edema - a specific pattern of swelling in the central retina
puffiness, swelling, lump - an abnormal protuberance or localized enlargement
anasarca - generalized edema with accumulation of serum in subcutaneous connective tissue
chemosis - edema of the mucous membrane of the eyeball and eyelid lining
papilledema - swelling of the optic disc (where the optic nerve enters the eyeball); usually associated with an increase in intraocular pressure
brain edema, cerebral edema - swelling of the brain due to the uptake of water in the neuropile and white matter
Translations
ödéma

edema

n (esp US) → Ödem nt

e·de·ma

n. edema, acumulación anormal de líquido en los tejidos intracelulares;
angioneurotic ______ angioneurótico;
brain ______ cerebral;
cardiac ______ cardíaco;
dependent ______ dependiente;
pitting ______ de fóvea;
pulmonary ______ pulmonar.

edema

n edema m, hinchazón f; pulmonary — edema pulmonar
References in periodicals archive ?
LPS had been reported to induce expression of inflammatory genes in lung epithelial cells of ALI models, which impairs lung epithelial channel function.[4] Epithelial channel proteins, such as Na +-K + ATPase, aquaporins, and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), play important roles in effective removal of excessive alveolar edema, named alveolar fluid clearance (AFC).[5],[6],[7] Among these channels, ENaC is the primary drive of fluid transport to maintain the epithelial fluid layer of pulmonary alveoli.
A number of common pathological pulmonary features appear in ARDS patients, such as increased permeability as reflected by alveolar edema due to epithelial and endothelial cell damage, and neutrophil infiltration in the early phase (3).
The most frequent inflammatory changes were increased inflammatory mediators, polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, predominant inflammatory cell type and secondary alveolar edema. It has been shown in the literature that pulmonary injuries are based on inflammation and that the major cells causing tissue injuries are neutrophils (17-19)
In addition, there is neutrophil recruitment, leading to hemorrhage, as well as interstitial and alveolar edema. Histopathologically, there is edema, transudate, and subsequent alveolar exudate, followed by type II pneumocyte apoptosis and formation of hyaline membranes.
A 4-point scale (0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe) was used to assess lung damage based on alveolar edema, inflammatory infiltration, and capillary congestion (Table 1).
This condition could also cause an increase in pulmonary capillary permeability, leading to alveolar edema. Possible complications include acute oxygenation deterioration, airway obstruction, mismatch of ventilation/perfusion, and hypoxemia.
VILI is associated with increasing vascular permeability and alveolar edema and increases the expression of proinflammatory cytokines [1, 2].
Resuscitation only can reduce neutrophil accumulation and the alveolar-capillary exudate but cannot alleviate alveolar edema. When combined with [H.sub.2] inhalation, the therapy significantly decreased in alveolar damage and alveolar edema as well [6].
These observations are in concordance with those of Bora Ozdemir et al (2012) (Intra alveolar haemorrhage and pulmonary edema together accounting for 71.2% of the cases), Alexandre de Matos et al in 2008 (Intra alveolar edema, pulmonary congestion and diffuse alveolar damage in 77.7% of the cases) and Bal et al in 2008 (Lungs showing terminal events like pulmonary edema and ARDS together accounting for 59.3% of cases).
Alveolar edema (%)###17 (100)###25 (100)###10 (100)###7 (100)###3 (100)