amanuensis

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a·man·u·en·sis

 (ə-măn′yo͞o-ĕn′sĭs)
n. pl. a·man·u·en·ses (-sēz)
One who is employed to take dictation or to copy manuscript.

[Latin āmanuēnsis, from the phrase (servus) ā manū, (slave) at handwriting : ā, ab, by; see ab-1 + manū, ablative of manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

amanuensis

(əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
a person employed to take dictation or to copy manuscripts
[C17: from Latin āmanuensis, from the phrase servus ā manū slave at hand (that is, handwriting)]

a•man•u•en•sis

(əˌmæn yuˈɛn sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another; secretary.
[1610–20; < Latin (servus) āmanuēnsis=ā- a-4 + manu-, s. of manus hand + -ēnsis -ensis]

amanuensis

- Literally "slave at hand"—for a literary assistant, especially one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.
See also related terms for slave.

amanuensis

Formal. 1. asecretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Occupations
Formal. 1. a secretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Aid
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)
secretarial assistant, secretary - an assistant who handles correspondence and clerical work for a boss or an organization
Translations

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈensɪs] N (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjuˈensiːz]amanuense mf

amanuensis

n pl <amanuenses> → Sekretär(in) m(f); (Hist) → Amanuensis m

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs] n (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjʊˈɛnsiːz] (frm) → amanuense m
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise, the research featured in Speaking Lives, Authoring Texts allows one of the few black (and Native American) amanuenses, Dr.
The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (1882-98) was a joint - albeit unacknowledged - enterprise, in which amanuenses worked for the greater good, not personal acclaim.
Those early children's officers did precisely that and like Pevsner's amanuenses 'helped as long as they lived'.
While selecting the relatively "vernacular" correspondence for analysis, heed has been paid to the following: a given soldier's/person's biographical data, unorthodox spellings, nonstandard grammatical features as well as relatively frequent apologetic remarks concerning the "bad righting" which indicate that the letters "might have been produced by less literate writers who did not have recourse to the help of amanuenses (.
As a consequence, from the very beginning the first black authors--and their sponsors, editors, or amanuenses, where such assisted in shaping the text--developed strategies to authenticate the texts in the eyes of their readers.
207)--his wife Harmony, and their daughter, Edith became his amanuenses.
Support provided includes amanuenses (scribes), additional time, coloured question papers and the use of word processors, based on the recommendations of educational psychologists.