amanuensis

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a·man·u·en·sis

 (ə-măn′yo͞o-ĕn′sĭs)
n. pl. a·man·u·en·ses (-sēz)
One who is employed to take dictation or to copy manuscript.

[Latin āmanuēnsis, from the phrase (servus) ā manū, (slave) at handwriting : ā, ab, by; see ab-1 + manū, ablative of manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

amanuensis

(əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
a person employed to take dictation or to copy manuscripts
[C17: from Latin āmanuensis, from the phrase servus ā manū slave at hand (that is, handwriting)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•man•u•en•sis

(əˌmæn yuˈɛn sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another; secretary.
[1610–20; < Latin (servus) āmanuēnsis=ā- a-4 + manu-, s. of manus hand + -ēnsis -ensis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

amanuensis

- Literally "slave at hand"—for a literary assistant, especially one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.
See also related terms for slave.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

amanuensis

Formal. 1. asecretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Occupations
Formal. 1. a secretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Aid
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)
secretarial assistant, secretary - an assistant who handles correspondence and clerical work for a boss or an organization
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈensɪs] N (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjuˈensiːz]amanuense mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

amanuensis

n pl <amanuenses> → Sekretär(in) m(f); (Hist) → Amanuensis m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs] n (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjʊˈɛnsiːz] (frm) → amanuense m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
His interlocutors act as his amanuenses: for example, transcribing the tale of KGB spy Rudolf Abel, who was apprehended in 1957 after he mistakenly gave his paper boy a hollow nickel containing microfilm of a coded message (part of Wakeman's narration in Hollow Coin), and the surprising history of the avian agents used for military communication and surveillance during World War II (a narrative strand that unfolds during War Pigeon).
The practice underscores the regularity with which scribes or amanuenses signed alba in the name of their patrons.
These texts and their amanuenses continue to play a significant role in South African religion.
Ahora toma pie de la Biblia para seguir las trazas de los fondos de la biblioteca de San Victor y su notable contribucion a la cultura de los tiempos medios: scriptoria; amanuenses, tipos de letra, ilustraciones y coloraciones; primeros propietarios y posteriores; donaciones; encuadernaciones y guardas, a veces tan interesantes; glosas anadidas, exlibris, indices posteriores, etc.
Likewise, the research featured in Speaking Lives, Authoring Texts allows one of the few black (and Native American) amanuenses, Dr.
Some have lost all relevance, such as Enoch Powell's decree that an 'Englishman owns up, pays up and shuts up'; but one that stays with me came from Lord Adrian who said, 'Don't expect to save the world, all your aim can be is to leave things better than when you found them.' Those early children's officers did precisely that and like Pevsner's amanuenses 'helped as long as they lived'.