amanuensis


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a·man·u·en·sis

 (ə-măn′yo͞o-ĕn′sĭs)
n. pl. a·man·u·en·ses (-sēz)
One who is employed to take dictation or to copy manuscript.

[Latin āmanuēnsis, from the phrase (servus) ā manū, (slave) at handwriting : ā, ab, by; see ab-1 + manū, ablative of manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

amanuensis

(əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
a person employed to take dictation or to copy manuscripts
[C17: from Latin āmanuensis, from the phrase servus ā manū slave at hand (that is, handwriting)]

a•man•u•en•sis

(əˌmæn yuˈɛn sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another; secretary.
[1610–20; < Latin (servus) āmanuēnsis=ā- a-4 + manu-, s. of manus hand + -ēnsis -ensis]

amanuensis

- Literally "slave at hand"—for a literary assistant, especially one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.
See also related terms for slave.

amanuensis

Formal. 1. asecretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Occupations
Formal. 1. a secretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Aid
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)
secretarial assistant, secretary - an assistant who handles correspondence and clerical work for a boss or an organization
Translations

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈensɪs] N (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjuˈensiːz]amanuense mf

amanuensis

n pl <amanuenses> → Sekretär(in) m(f); (Hist) → Amanuensis m

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs] n (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjʊˈɛnsiːz] (frm) → amanuense m
References in classic literature ?
The writer, indeed, seems to think himself obliged to keep even pace with time, whose amanuensis he is; and, like his master, travels as slowly through centuries of monkish dulness, when the world seems to have been asleep, as through that bright and busy age so nobly distinguished by the excellent Latin poet--
He said that men cured in this way, and enabled to discard the grape system, never afterward got over the habit of talking as if they were dictating to a slow amanuensis, because they always made a pause between each two words while they sucked the substance out of an imaginary grape.
The task, notwithstanding the assistance of my amanuensis, has been a somewhat laborious one, but your society has happily prevented me from that too continuous prosecution of thought beyond the hours of study which has been the snare of my solitary life.
Jack Maldon having lately proffered his occasional services as an amanuensis, and not being accustomed to that occupation; but we should soon put right what was amiss, and go on swimmingly.
Nicholas briefly replied, that he wanted to know whether there was any such post to be had, as secretary or amanuensis to a gentleman.
And it was easy to see how necessary such an amanuensis was to him, by the tenor and spelling of the numerous letters which he sent to her, entreating her and commanding her to return.
This perhaps underestimates Charlotte's role (the manuscripts of his poems, for example, show that she was given an active role as amanuensis as he worked on their complex notes) and Scott's deeper feelings for her, suggested, as Dunlop herself acknowledges, by his response to her death.
Christina served as Anne's amanuensis as Anne wrote her memoirs, and she later married a Wiltshire landowner and had seven children.
An album may contain inscriptions--memories or reminders--from friends whom the owner never met in the flesh, or from friends who employed a scribe or amanuensis to produce an inscription.
Juan De Vere, the novel's backward-looking narrator, is twenty-three at the time and working as an amanuensis (i.
Johannes Merz, Lydia's amanuensis, notes that African names are given depending on the gender of the child and the day it was born.
Thomas discusses not only Prince's narrative in relation to the supplemental material in the text and the ensuing legal battle but also the editorial efforts of the Anti-Slavery Society and the other projects of Prince's editor (Thomas Pringle) and amanuensis (Susanna Strickland).