Necker cube

(redirected from ambiguous figure)
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Necker cube

(ˈnɛkə)
n
a line drawing showing the 12 edges of a transparent cube, so that it can be seen alternately facing in two different directions: an example of an ambiguous figure
[C19: named after Louis Albert Necker (1786–1861), Swiss mineralogist]
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet the warrior churchman is also a uniquely ambiguous figure, straddling the ecclesiastical and secular spheres of authority--at once prohibited by canon law to participate in war, and expected by secular powers to participate in regional politics.
Included in her Venice Biennale exhibition of the same year, this simultaneously appealing and, yet, disturbingly ambiguous figure plays on a stereotyped yet traditional image of Welsh identity, a woman in national costume.
He is an ambiguous figure. He told me times and accounts and what he did were the acts of a madman and he was deeply disturbed by what he did.
"Steve Jobs was a wonderfully ambiguous figure," said Stanford University communication department professor Fred Turner.
"He's this severe, repressed, slightly ambiguous figure, who's all about business and couldn't be more different from Pepper."
At once proselytiser, intermediary, ethnographer, linguist and cultural go-between, the missionary is an ambiguous figure. This is certainly the case with London Missionary Society missionary Lancelot Edward Threlkeld.
"But," she said, and paused to choose her words carefully, "he's an ambiguous figure for me.
Hamm's queer reading of the text points to the sexually ambiguous figure of Byron (whose portrait appears at a critical moment and to whom the avant-propos alludes), Octave's morbid attachment to his mother, his violent encounters with other men, his narcissism, and his strange desire to be killed by a young bunter (un "enfant chasseur," 77).
concludes: "Tyrrell, even in his own day, was something of an enigmatic and ambiguous figure so far as the English province was concerned.
A more ambiguous figure was William Hague, foreign secretary and former party leader.
But Sawday's fondness for prolepsis--typified by a sentence such as "Three hundred years before that twentieth-century fascination with the fusion of machine and animal which Donna Haraway has traced to the ambiguous figure of the cyborg, [Robert] Hooke, the seventeenth-century fabricator of instruments, had already begun to see in nature a form of hybridization between mechanisms and organic life" (225)--also occasionally threatens to undermine his central claim: namely, that we are "the heirs to the mechanical culture of the Renaissance" (70).