ambivalence

(redirected from ambivalance)
Also found in: Medical.

am·biv·a·lence

 (ăm-bĭv′ə-ləns)
n.
1. The coexistence of opposing attitudes or feelings, such as love and hate, toward a person, object, or idea.
2. Uncertainty or indecisiveness as to which course to follow.

[German Ambivalenz : Latin ambi-, ambi- + Latin valentia, vigor (from valēns, valent-, present participle of valēre, to be strong; see wal- in Indo-European roots).]

ambivalence

(æmˈbɪvələns) or

ambivalency

n
the simultaneous existence of two opposed and conflicting attitudes, emotions, etc
amˈbivalent adj

am•biv•a•lence

(æmˈbɪv ə ləns)

also am•biv′a•len•cy,



n.
uncertainty or fluctuation, esp. when caused by inability to make a choice or by a simultaneous desire to say or do two opposite things.
[1910–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ambivalence - mixed feelings or emotionsambivalence - mixed feelings or emotions    
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
conflict - opposition between two simultaneous but incompatible feelings; "he was immobilized by conflict and indecision"

ambivalence

noun indecision, doubt, opposition, conflict, uncertainty, contradiction, wavering, fluctuation, hesitancy, equivocation, vacillation, irresolution I've never hidden my ambivalence about getting married.
Translations
ambivalencijaambivalentnost

ambivalence

[æmˈbɪvələns] Nambivalencia f

ambivalence

[æmˈbɪvələns] nambivalence f
ambivalence about sth → ambivalence à propos de qch
ambivalence towards sb/sth → ambivalence envers qn/qch

ambivalence

nAmbivalenz f

ambivalence

[æmˈbɪvələns] nambivalenza

am·biv·a·lence

n. ambivalencia.

ambivalence

n ambivalencia
References in periodicals archive ?
Attitudes towards violence againts women in marriage: the effects of ambivalance sexism, age, education and income levels.
The public's image of urban parks: Past amenity, present ambivalance, uncertain future.
(1.) "Better a Bloody Shovel Than Ambivalance" derives from an Oxford English Dictionary variant of "to call a spade a spade": "to call a spade a bloody shovel."
Resident's of Bulger's former South Boston neighborhood remembered him with ambivalance, but some expressed fondness.
Bhabha, Homi, "Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalance of Colonial Discourse", October Cilt 28, 1984, s.125-133.
(28) We would like to thank Elisabeth Ozdalga for directing our attention to the non-negative emotions and ambivalance of radical Islamists towards the West.
The praise of an extensive moral code takes place on the backdrop of what scholars have come to recognized as the ambivalance of dream imagery in medieval poetry (Spearing, 1976; Lynch, 1988; and Kruger, 1992).