ambivalently


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Related to ambivalently: conferred, excitability, waylaid

am·biv·a·lent

 (ăm-bĭv′ə-lənt)
adj.
Exhibiting or feeling ambivalence.

am·biv′a·lent·ly adv.

ambivalently

(æmˈbɪvələntlɪ)
adv
in an ambivalent manner
Translations

ambivalently

[æmˈbɪvələntli] adv [feel, respond] → de façon ambivalente
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not just a revisiting or examination of the dark corners in the world of our fathers or our mothers; it is also a view onto the world of contemporary Jews and how they (we) came, ambivalently yet dynamically, to consider and represent sexuality as gendered, ethnic, and national subjects.
Throughout, he also considers, often ambivalently, his Jewish identity: "Two thousand years can't be overcome by leaving for somewhere We live always in the troubled memory of them.
Many in the community suffered and most were sympathetic to the cause--which never included shutting down factories, just compelling them to operate responsibly--but found themselves ambivalently caught between the conflicting demands of economic and health priorities.
He parallels "radically unsettled" and "extraordinarily heterogeneous" points of view in response to the Reformation in England with emotionally-charged moments on stage such as "Marcus's flowered rhetoric" when he witnesses the horror of "Lavinia's ruined body" in Titus Andronicus and humiliated Shylock's call for revenge in The Merchant of Venice to which audiences respond ambivalently (76, 69).
Yet the performance concluded less ambivalently, with the words of Nina Simone: "How can you be an artist and not reflect the times?
137), Confessions (revelations of facts or emotions that appear trustworthy and that the audience can relate to), Ordinariness (especially concerning people appearing in the media who come across as just ordinary people, as opposed to glamourous celebrities or experts), Ambivalence (it seems more authentic if something is presented ambivalently or even reluctantly, for example a fake blogger who discloses facts about him/herself) and Imperfection (too perfect is not credible).
Bold, direct, and devoted to the growth of American literature," Neal was an early appreciator, Kopley argues, of both Hawthorne and Poe, and both authors clearly saw him as a force to be reckoned with: Poe dedicated to him "Tamerlane," and Hawthorne, perhaps less enthusiastically, and likely more ambivalently, in "The Hall of Fantasy" refers to Neal's "rampant muse [who] belches wildfire.
As well as the insecure internal working model of attachment, ambivalently attached children may be afraid that they will experience negative social interaction outside the family.
The products Malone and Walker promoted were viewed ambivalently by some black leaders who felt that efforts to lighten skin and straighten hair were accommodating white ideals of beauty.
The narrative's admonitions do not seem to be retrogressive as the two faces of life are ambivalently fused together in a whole whose moderate totality is essential for moral and psychic health.
Like many works of the Nouvelle Vague (with which Malle is somewhat ambivalently associated) "Atlantic City" does seem dated.
Although the Manggarai are now Catholic, they still ambivalently perform agricultural rituals to converse with and placate spirits in what she calls 'conversations with the environment' and she provides some examples of how the environment is spoken of as animated.