ambivalently


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Related to ambivalently: conferred, excitability, waylaid

am·biv·a·lent

 (ăm-bĭv′ə-lənt)
adj.
Exhibiting or feeling ambivalence.

am·biv′a·lent·ly adv.

ambivalently

(æmˈbɪvələntlɪ)
adv
in an ambivalent manner
Translations

ambivalently

[æmˈbɪvələntli] adv [feel, respond] → de façon ambivalente
References in periodicals archive ?
Pakistan is ambivalently following different ways to cope with problems emerging from social, economic and political wings.
Previous attempts at cultural stimulus here have been ambivalently received.
South Koreans would take Kim's ouster ambivalently _ with the fear of instability and the hope of lasting peace.
This extends to the authors' deep understanding of the ways that political memes and digital cultural artifacts more generally are understood by these communities of interpretation: ambivalently. Phillips and Milner make the deeply compelling case that these communities create cultural artifacts that are supposed to be understood ambivalently, not earnestly, and through that very ambivalence lies the basis of social solidarity and social distinction.
It is not just a revisiting or examination of the dark corners in the world of our fathers or our mothers; it is also a view onto the world of contemporary Jews and how they (we) came, ambivalently yet dynamically, to consider and represent sexuality as gendered, ethnic, and national subjects.
Throughout, he also considers, often ambivalently, his Jewish identity: "Two thousand years can't be overcome by leaving for somewhere We live always in the troubled memory of them."
Many in the community suffered and most were sympathetic to the cause--which never included shutting down factories, just compelling them to operate responsibly--but found themselves ambivalently caught between the conflicting demands of economic and health priorities.
He parallels "radically unsettled" and "extraordinarily heterogeneous" points of view in response to the Reformation in England with emotionally-charged moments on stage such as "Marcus's flowered rhetoric" when he witnesses the horror of "Lavinia's ruined body" in Titus Andronicus and humiliated Shylock's call for revenge in The Merchant of Venice to which audiences respond ambivalently (76, 69).
Yet the performance concluded less ambivalently, with the words of Nina Simone: "How can you be an artist and not reflect the times?"
137), Confessions (revelations of facts or emotions that appear trustworthy and that the audience can relate to), Ordinariness (especially concerning people appearing in the media who come across as just ordinary people, as opposed to glamourous celebrities or experts), Ambivalence (it seems more authentic if something is presented ambivalently or even reluctantly, for example a fake blogger who discloses facts about him/herself) and Imperfection (too perfect is not credible).
"Bold, direct, and devoted to the growth of American literature," Neal was an early appreciator, Kopley argues, of both Hawthorne and Poe, and both authors clearly saw him as a force to be reckoned with: Poe dedicated to him "Tamerlane," and Hawthorne, perhaps less enthusiastically, and likely more ambivalently, in "The Hall of Fantasy" refers to Neal's "rampant muse [who] belches wildfire." Kopley's detailed accounts of Neal's evaluations--some of them proved "right" by later critics, and some impressively "wrong" (he found "Young Good Brown" "unsatisfactory")--bring to life the rough-and-tumble world of newspaper and journal publication with which all early nineteenth-century writers had to contend.
The story ends ambivalently, without apology: "I must say that our behavior is continually under review and any one error alters our prestige, but there'll be none of that lifting up my eyes unto the hills." The disjunction is intentional and unsettling, as it should be.