ambrosia


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

am·bro·sia

 (ăm-brō′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
1. Greek & Roman Mythology The food of the gods, thought to confer immortality.
2. Something with an especially delicious flavor or fragrance.
3. A dessert of mixed fruits, usually including oranges and pineapple, combined with flaked coconut and often marshmallows.

[Latin, from Greek ambrosiā, from ambrotos, immortal, immortalizing; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

am·bro′sial (ăm-brō′zhəl, -zhē-əl) adj.
am·bro′sial·ly adv.

ambrosia

(æmˈbrəʊzɪə)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the food of the gods, said to bestow immortality. Compare nectar2
2. anything particularly delightful to taste or smell
3. (Zoology) another name for beebread
4. (Plants) any of various herbaceous plants constituting the genus Ambrosia, mostly native to America but widely naturalized: family Asteraceae (composites). The genus includes the ragweeds
[C16: via Latin from Greek: immortality, from ambrotos, from a-1 + brotos mortal]
amˈbrosial, amˈbrosian adj
amˈbrosially adv

am•bro•sia

(æmˈbroʊ ʒə)

n.
1. the food of the ancient Greek and Roman gods, ensuring their immortality.
2. something especially delicious to taste or smell.
3. a dessert of oranges, shredded coconut, and often pineapple.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek: immortality, food of the gods, n. use of feminine of ambrósios=a- a-6 + -mbrosios, comb. form of brotōs mortal]
am•bro′sial, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ambrosia - a mixture of nectar and pollen prepared by worker bees and fed to larvaeambrosia - a mixture of nectar and pollen prepared by worker bees and fed to larvae
composition - a mixture of ingredients
2.ambrosia - any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthmaambrosia - any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthma
genus Ambrosia - comprising the ragweeds; in some classification considered the type genus of a separate family Ambrosiaceae
Ambrosia artemisiifolia, common ragweed - annual weed with finely divided foliage and spikes of green flowers; common in North America; introduced elsewhere accidentally
Ambrosia trifida, great ragweed - a coarse annual with some leaves deeply and palmately three-cleft or five-cleft
Ambrosia psilostachya, perennial ragweed, western ragweed - coarse perennial ragweed with creeping roots of dry barren lands of southwestern United States and Mexico
weed - any plant that crowds out cultivated plants
3.ambrosia - fruit dessert made of oranges and bananas with shredded coconutambrosia - fruit dessert made of oranges and bananas with shredded coconut
afters, dessert, sweet - a dish served as the last course of a meal
4.ambrosia - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the godsambrosia - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
Translations
ambrosia
ambrosia
ambrozija
ambrozija
ambrosia
ambrozija
ambrosia

ambrosia

[æmˈbrəʊzɪə] Nambrosía f

ambrosia

[æmˈbrəʊziə] n (in Greek mythology)ambroisie f

ambrosia

n (Myth, fig) → Ambrosia f

ambrosia

[æmˈbrəʊzɪə] n (liter) → ambrosia
References in classic literature ?
Around him on the bier itself were laid some books, and several papers open and folded; and those who were looking on as well as those who were opening the grave and all the others who were there preserved a strange silence, until one of those who had borne the body said to another, "Observe carefully, Ambrosia if this is the place Chrysostom spoke of, since you are anxious that what he directed in his will should be so strictly complied with."
But when he had provided those three with all things fitting, nectar and ambrosia which the gods themselves eat, and when their proud spirit revived within them all after they had fed on nectar and delicious ambrosia, then it was that the father of men and gods spoke amongst them:
And though our tropes of fairyland be mixed with those of entomology they shall not spill one drop of ambrosia from the rose-crowned melody of Maggie's one perfect night.
We feasted that evening as on nectar and ambrosia; and not the least delight of the entertainment was the smile of gratification with which our hostess regarded us, as we satisfied our famished appetites on the delicate fare she liberally supplied.
However, we quickly despatched them, and no ambrosia could have been more delicious.
In what apartment is he to be placed, sir; and at what table is he to receive his nectar and ambrosia?”
Diana and Venus, no doubt, abused the beautiful Alcmena and poor Io, when they condescended, for distraction's sake, to speak, amidst nectar and ambrosia, of mortal beauties, at the table of Jupiter.
"Well, then, that green preserve is nothing less than the ambrosia which Hebe served at the table of Jupiter."
He came one day with the book and begged me to read it, having discovered that my interest in Luther was not as living as it ought to be; so I took it out with me into the garden, because the dullest book takes on a certain saving grace if read out of doors, just as bread and butter, devoid of charm in the drawing-room, is ambrosia eaten under a tree.
I rose as at thy call, but found thee not; To find thee I directed then my walk; And on, methought, alone I pass'd through ways That brought me on a sudden to the Tree Of interdicted Knowledge: fair it seem'd, Much fairer to my Fancie then by day: And as I wondring lookt, beside it stood One shap'd & wing'd like one of those from Heav'n By us oft seen; his dewie locks distill'd Ambrosia; on that Tree he also gaz'd; And O fair Plant, said he, with fruit surcharg'd, Deigns none to ease thy load and taste thy sweet, Nor God, nor Man; is Knowledge so despis'd?
Our ambuscade would have been intolerable, for the stench of the fishy seals was most distressing {45}--who would go to bed with a sea monster if he could help it?--but here, too, the goddess helped us, and thought of something that gave us great relief, for she put some ambrosia under each man's nostrils, which was so fragrant that it killed the smell of the seals.
She hid them in a thick cloud, and Simois made ambrosia spring up for them to eat; the two goddesses then went on, flying like turtledoves in their eagerness to help the Argives.