ambuscado

ambuscado

(ˌæmbəˈskeɪdəʊ)
n, pl ambuscados
an ambush
References in periodicals archive ?
Fabricating a military crisis, Nicholas and the others lead Gabriel to institute what might be termed "a state of exception." (48) Finally bringing to a head the violent intimations and calls to "cut" the legs from under the authorities, Gabriel gives the signal to attack when Crosswill and Rooksbill arrive: "An ambuscado of the enemy.
an ambuscado of innocent Travellers."(51) Captain John Smith argued that the establishment of a colony in Virginia would "so employ and encourage a great part of our idlers ...
cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep, and then anon Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes, And being thus frighted swears a prayer or two And sleeps again.