colitis

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co·li·tis

 (kə-lī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the colon. Also called colonitis.

colitis

(kɒˈlaɪtɪs; kə-) or

colonitis

n
(Pathology) inflammation of the colon
colitic adj

co•li•tis

(kəˈlaɪ tɪs, koʊ-)

n.
inflammation of the colon.
[1855–60]

colitis

Inflammation of the large intestine or colon. It may result from a viral or bacterial infection, causing pain and severe diarrhea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colitis - inflammation of the colon
Crohn's disease, regional enteritis, regional ileitis - a serious chronic and progressive inflammation of the ileum producing frequent bouts of diarrhea with abdominal pain and nausea and fever and weight loss
irritable bowel syndrome, mucous colitis, spastic colon - recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea (often alternating with periods of constipation); often associated with emotional stress
ulcerative colitis - a serious chronic inflammatory disease of the large intestine and rectum characterized by recurrent episodes of abdominal pain and fever and chills and profuse diarrhea
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
Translations
kolitida
paksunsuolen tulehdus

colitis

[kɒˈlaɪtɪs] Ncolitis f

colitis

[kɒʊˈlaɪtɪs kəˈlaɪtɪs] ncolite f

colitis

[kɒˈlaɪtɪs] n (Med) → colite f

co·li·tis

n. colitis, infl. del colon;
chronic ______ crónica;
pseudomembranous ______ mucomembranosa;
spasmodic ______ espasmódica;
ulcerative ______ ulcerativa.

colitis

n colitis f; ischemic — colitis isquémica; microscopic — colitis microscópica; pseudomembranous — colitis seudomembranosa; ulcerative — colitis ulcerosa
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers suggested that the work could prove important in the efforts to develop a vaccine for amebic colitis, also known as amebiasis.
Clinical manifestation of amebiasis generally occurs in the form of intestinal involvement as acute or subacute colitis, with symptoms range from mild diarrhea to severe dysentery producing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bloody stools, to fulminant amebic colitis.
These laboratory findings together with clinical manifestations such as high-grade fever and toxic state have been described usually with amebic liver abscess, the commonest form of invasive amebiasis, (1,25,26) and rarely with severe amebic colitis in young children when the colon was found to be necrotic with several perforations leading to peritonitis.
Diagnosis of amebic liver abscess and amebic colitis by detection of Entamoeba histolytica DNA in blood, urine, and saliva by a real-time PCR assay.
Although amebic colitis is frequently seen among older infants, symptomatic infection is rarely seen in the neonate.
In Egypt, 38 percent of individuals that went to an outpatient clinic with acute diarrhea were found to have amebic colitis.
Use of rapid dipstick and latex agglutination tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of amebic liver abscess, amebic colitis, and Entamoeba histolytica cyst passage.
In a mouse model of amebic colitis and a hamster model of amebic liver abscess, the drug markedly decreased the number of parasites, damage from inflammation, and size of liver abscesses.