amen

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Related to amens: Ames test

A·men

 (ä′mən)
n. Mythology
Variant of Amun.

a·men

 (ā-mĕn′, ä-mĕn′)
interj.
Used at the end of a prayer or a statement to express assent or approval.

[Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin āmēn, from Greek, from Hebrew 'āmēn, certainly, verily, from 'āman, to be firm; see ʔmn in Semitic roots.]

amen

(ˌeɪˈmɛn; ˌɑːˈmɛn)
interj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) so be it!: a term used at the end of a prayer or religious statement
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the use of the word amen, as at the end of a prayer
2. say amen to to express strong approval of or support for (an assertion, hope, etc)
[C13: via Late Latin via Greek from Hebrew āmēn certainly]

Amen

(ˈɑːmən) ,

Amon

or

Amūn

n
(Non-European Myth & Legend) Egyptian myth a local Theban god, having a ram's head and symbolizing life and fertility, identified by the Egyptians with the national deity Amen-Ra

a•men

(ˈeɪˈmɛn, ˈɑˈmɛn)

interj.
1. it is so; so be it (used after a prayer, creed, or other formal statement to express solemn ratification or agreement).
n.
2. an utterance of the interjection “amen.”
3. an expression of concurrence or assent: The committee gave its amen to the proposal.
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English < Late Latin < Greek < Hebrew āmēn]

A•men

or A•mon

(ˈɑ mən)

n.
a primeval Egyptian deity, worshiped, esp. at Thebes, as the personification of air or breath and represented as either a ram or a goose: later identified with Amen-Ra.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amen - a primeval Egyptian personification of air and breathAmen - a primeval Egyptian personification of air and breath; worshipped especially at Thebes
Egyptian deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Egyptians
Translations
آمين
amen
amen
aamentotisesti
ámen
アーメン
amen
amen
amen
âmin

amen

[ˈɑːˈmen]
A. EXCLamén
amen to thatasí sea, ojalá sea así
B. Namén m

amen

[ˌɑːˈmɛn] excl
(RELIGION)amen
(endorsing a comment) amen to that! → tout à fait !

amen

interjamen; amen to that! (fig inf)ja, wahrlich or fürwahr! (hum)
nAmen nt; we’ll all say amen to that (fig inf)wir befürworten das alle, wir sind alle dafür

amen

[ˈɑːˈmɛn] exclcosì sia, amen

amen

(ˌaːgmen) , (ˌeiˈmen) interjection, noun
(usually Amen) said or sung by Jews or Christians to express a wish that the prayer should be fulfilled.
References in classic literature ?
But he punished the Amens tremendously; and when he gave out the psalm - always giving the whole verse - he looked all round the congregation first, as much as to say, "You have heard my friend overhead; oblige me with your opinion of this style
Dinah smiled, but gave no promise to stay, and they talked of other things through the rest of the walk, lingering in the sunshine to look at the great flock of geese grazing, at the new corn-ricks, and at the surprising abundance of fruit on the old pear-tree; Nancy and Molly having already hastened home, side by side, each holding, carefully wrapped in her pocket-handkerchief, a prayer-book, in which she could read little beyond the large letters and the Amens.
She also advises against the slurred "cut" amens, or amen katufa, describing amens that are not fully pronounced, such as "amei.
What's striking about this passage is not that God thought a woman's digestive tract could determine guilt, but that it is the Bible's first--as well as history's first documented--mention of the term amen.
In early biblical passages, amen "is used as an affirmation, particularly with respect to a curse," explains Yochanan Rivkin, a rabbi at Tulane University's Chabad House, but softens in later texts when used as an affirmation after a blessing, which is how it continues to be used today.
Yeshiva students are often taught that amen is an acronym for el melekh ne'eman, meaning "God, Trustworthy King," but Jon Levenson, a professor of Jewish studies at Harvard University, insists this is just homeletical fun.
The foundation of Amens teachings at her Mamasita Movement and Wellness Studio in Washington.
FOOD IS YOUR MEDICINE OR YOUR POISON--you make the choice every nine you eat " Amen learned early on that maintaining good health could yield great rewards.
says Amen alluding to black resistance to these exercises.
The rabbinic visions of blessings and amens is expressed by the verse (Proverbs 14.
And we can share loving, supportive amens, praying that one another's petitions come true, adding our voices to each other's grateful thanksgivings.
In this essay I examine the laws of saying amen to blessings in order to explore how certain legal decisions construct Judaic meaning.