ampelography


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ampelography

(ˌæmpəˈlɒɡrəfɪ)
n
the science concerned with the identification and classification of grapevinesan encyclopaedia or reference book of grape varieties

ampelography

the branch of botany that studies the cultivation of grapes. — ampelographer, n.
See also: Botany
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First recognized in East Coast viticultural circles for her translation from the French of Pierre Galet's book, "A Practical Ampelography: Grapevine Identification," Lucie Morton has helped countless potential growers and existing vineyard owners understand all aspects of vineyard management, from site selection to grapevine maintenance.
In my first five minutes with this book I learned that there is a difference between an Ampelology' and the more common, but often incorrectly used Ampelography: There are even two indexes here, a general one, and a separate 10-page index just for grapes.
Since 1923, CRA-VIT has studied issues related to the grapevine including ampelography, genetic improvement, breeding, biology, physiology, protection, propagation, ecology, agronomic (and more recently metabolomic and transcriptomic) techniques.
There were classical studies based on vine vegetation and fruit attributes, a study called ampelography. These were typically regional and were difficult to use, as one grape variety may have many names, both within and between locations.
While researching the story of California's Zinfandel variety two decades ago, the closest sounding predecessors I could find for the name Zinfandel were zierfandler and zierfahndler, in a Czech ampelography book (1).
In addition, he helped in the development of a much needed ampelography entitled Wine Grape Varieties in California, which can be ordered from the University of California, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources in Oakland.
Even in my ampelography books grapevines are necessarily presented with military precision.
exporters have, namely Tannat." (Tannat also is known as Moustrou and Bordeleza Blecha, according to A Practical Ampelography, translated by Lucie Morton.)
Olmo says that at the time, Maynard Amerine, the famed university enologist who had little knowledge of ampelography, would often leave vine and fruit samples from around the state in brown paper bags on Olmo's desk, labeled only with the location of the vineyard from which they came.