ampelopsis


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ampelopsis

(ˌæmpɪˈlɒpsɪs)
n
(Plants) any woody vine of the vitaceous genus Ampelopsis, of tropical and subtropical Asia and America
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek ampelos grapevine]
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Dihydromyricetin is a natural flavonoid and principal component of the Chinese herbal tea, Ampelopsis grossedentata, with numerous health-promoting bioactivities.
Lee et al., "Effect of Ampelopsis Radix on wound healing in scalded rats," BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol.
Wang et al., "Suppression of inflammatory responses by dihydromyricetin, a flavonoid from Ampelopsis grossedentata, via inhibiting the activation of NF-[kappa]B and MAPK signaling pathways," Journal of Natural Products, vol.
Commonly known as porcelainberry, Ampelopsis elegans is a sturdy climber with vine-like leaves, curly pink tendrils and attractive plump, round berries in lilac, purple and cream.
A case in point is the porcelain berry (Ampelopsis glandulosa var.
Xu, "Physicochemical properties, in vitro antioxidant activities and inhibitory potential against [alpha]-glucosidase of polysaccharides from ampelopsis grossedentata leaves and stems," Molecules, vol.
Myricitrin (Figure 5(g)) is a flavone exact from the root bark of Myrica cerifera, Myrica esculenta, Ampelopsis grossedentata, and other plants.
Dihydromyricetin, also known as ampelopsin belonging to flavonoid family, is isolated from Ampelopsis grossedentata, which grows widely in the south of China.
Ampelopsis grossedentata has been widely used as a traditional Chinese herb in the south region of China.
Jing Wan Hong ointment comprises 30 kinds of Chinese herbs, which mainly include radix ampelopsis, Angelica dahurica, Chinese lobelia, borneol, rhizoma atractylodis, red peony root, Rhizoma Ligustici Chuanxiong, and pangolin.
[149.] Xu, Z., Liu, X., and Xu, G., 1995 Chemical constituents of roots of Ampelopsis brevipedunculata (Maxim) Trautv.
In ground vegetation, as well as climbing high, vines are locally frequent: greenbriars (especially Smilax bona-box on drier sites), grape vines (several species), peppervine (Ampelopsis arborea on damper sites), poisonivy (Toxicodendron radicans var.