amphictyon


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Related to amphictyon: amphictyony

amphictyon

(æmˈfɪktɪən)
n
(Historical Terms) a delegate to an amphictyonic council
[C16: back formation from amphictyons, from Greek amphiktiones neighbours, from amphi- + ktizein to found]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Amphictyon, we are told, was the author of that which bore his name.
The Amphictyons were the guardians of religion, and of the immense riches belonging to the temple of Delphos, where they had the right of jurisdiction in controversies between the inhabitants and those who came to consult the oracle.
The Amphictyons had in their hands the superstition of the times, one of the principal engines by which government was then maintained; they had a declared authority to use coercion against refractory cities, and were bound by oath to exert this authority on the necessary occasions.
The Thebans, with others of the cities, undertook to maintain the authority of the Amphictyons, and to avenge the violated god.
"No," replied Grandfather; "the different colonies did not compose one nation together; it was merely a confederacy among the governments: It somewhat resembled the league of the Amphictyons, which you remember in Grecian history.
The author of the "Amphictyon" essays in the Richmond Enquirer (137) insisted that any claim that the states were not sovereign parties to a compact was "untenable in itself, and fatal in its consequences." (138) In the same newspaper, Virginia Judge Spencer Roane approvingly cited an 1821 resolution by the Pennsylvania General Assembly that called the Constitution "to all intents and purposes a treaty between sovereign states." (139) Marshall fired back in the press:
He wrote them in response to pieces by "Amphictyon" and "Hampden." Hampden, as Marshall and everyone in Virginia knew, was the redoubtable Spencer Roane, eminent judge of Virginia's Court of Appeals, an opponent of the Constitution in 1788, and an outspoken champion of states' rights in resisting the Supreme Court's mandate in 1813.
The editor of the Richmond Enquirer, Thomas Richie, published a series of pseudonymous papers written by "Amphictyon" and "Hampden," both of whom castigated Marshall's broad interpretation of federal power.
(192.) A Virginian's "Amphictyon" Essays, RICHMOND ENQUIRER, March 30-April 2, 1819, reprinted in JOHN MARSHALL'S DEFENSE, supra note 190, at 54.
According to the myth, Amphictyon, son of Deucalion and Pyrrah, ordered the wine mixed with water at meetings of his councilors to dilute its strength and therefore cut down on drunkenness and quarrels.
(16.) The essays criticizing M'Culloch were published by two pseudonymous authors, "Amphictyon" (probably Judge William Brockenbrough) and "Hampden" (Judge Spencer Roane).
See also "A Virginian's 'Amphictyon' Essays," and "Roane's 'Hampden' Essays," John Marshall's Defense of McCulloch v.