amphictyonic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to amphictyonic: amphictyony

am·phic·ty·o·ny

 (ăm-fĭk′tē-ə-nē)
n. pl. am·phic·ty·o·nies
A league of neighboring ancient Greek states sharing a common religious center or shrine, especially the one at Delphi.

[Greek Amphiktuonia, from amphiktuones, variant of amphiktiones, neighbors : amphi-, on the periphery; see amphi- + ktizein, to settle; see tkei- in Indo-European roots.]

am·phic′ty·on′ic (-ŏn′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The Phocians having ploughed up some consecrated ground belonging to the temple of Apollo, the Amphictyonic council, according to the superstition of the age, imposed a fine on the sacrilegious offenders.
The Amphictyonic confederacy, of which she had been a member, left her in the full exercise of her government and her legislation.
Whilst the Amphictyonic confederacy remained, that of the Achaeans, which comprehended the less important cities only, made little figure on the theatre of Greece.
AMONG the confederacies of antiquity, the most considerable was that of the Grecian republics, associated under the Amphictyonic council.
In one, he listed the "Vices of the Political Systems of the United States." (32) In the other, he wrote out a list of notes "On Ancient And Modern Confederacies," beginning with three Greek confederacies: the Lycian Confederacy (200 BC to 43 BC), the Amphictyonic League (which began at an unknown time--Madison believed about 1500 BC--and ended some time in the 2nd century AD), and the Achean Confederacy (280 BC-146 BC).
As in the case of Greek amphictyonic councils, the verdict is binding on all parties, and if resisted, the assembly can use various means to make the rebel member return to reason (Cruce 1623: 72).