amphiprostyle


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amphiprostyle
plan of the Temple of Athena Nike at the Acropolis
Athens, Greece

am·phip·ro·style

 (ăm-fĭp′rō-stīl′, ăm′fĭ-prō′stīl′)
adj.
Having a prostyle or set of columns at each end but none along the sides, as in some Greek temples.

[Latin amphiprostȳlos, from Greek amphiprostūlos : amphi-, amphi- + prostūlos, with pillars in front; see prostyle.]

am·phip′ro·style′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

amphiprostyle

(æmˈfɪprəˌstaɪl; ˌæmfɪˈprəʊstaɪl)
adj
(Architecture) (esp of a classical temple) having a set of columns at both ends but not at the sides
n
(Architecture) a temple of this kind
amˌphiproˈstylar adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

am•phip•ro•style

(æmˈfɪp rəˌstaɪl, ˌæm fəˈproʊ staɪl)

adj.
(of a classical temple) having a portico with columns on both fronts, but not on the sides.
[1700–10; < Latin amphiprostȳlus < Greek amphipróstȳlos. See amphi-, prostyle]
am•phip`ro•sty′lar, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

amphiprostyle

A temple with columns and a portico at each end.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.amphiprostyle - marked by columniation having free columns in porticoes either at both ends or at both sides of a structure
apteral - having columns at one or both ends but not along the sides
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to face the threat, the Turks undertook a number of defensive works along the western side of the Acropolis for which they used the blocks of the temple of Athena Nike as building material after dismantling this small amphiprostyle temple.