amphisbaena

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am·phis·bae·na

 (ăm′fĭs-bē′nə)
n.
A mythical serpent or winged creature having a head at each end of its body.

[Middle English amphibena, from Latin amphisbaena, from Greek amphisbaina : amphis, both ways (from amphi-, amphi-) + bainein, to go; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

am′phis·bae′nic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

amphisbaena

(ˌæmfɪsˈbiːnə)
n, pl -nae (-niː) or -nas
1. (Animals) any worm lizard of the genus Amphisbaena
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a poisonous serpent having a head at each end and able to move forwards or backwards
[C16: via Latin from Greek amphisbaina, from amphis both ways + bainein to go]
ˌamphisˈbaenic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amphisbaena - (classical mythology) a serpent with a head at each end of its body
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
mythical creature, mythical monster - a monster renowned in folklore and myth
2.amphisbaena - type genus of the AmphisbaenidaeAmphisbaena - type genus of the Amphisbaenidae  
reptile genus - a genus of reptiles
worm lizard - a lizard of the genus Amphisbaena; harmless wormlike limbless lizard of warm or tropical regions having concealed eyes and ears and a short blunt tail
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only polished versification, sententious pentameter and hexameter, until, having turned out its toes long enough without dancing, and pattered with its lips long enough without piping, suddenly Astrsea returns to the earth, and a Day of Judgment of a sort, and there bursts out a song at last again, a most curtly melodious triplet of Amphisbaenic ryme.
Hence, as the symbol of the "amphisbaenic snake" (a snake with a head at either end) indicates, this regenerative process is reversible.