amurca


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amurca

- Sediment in olive oil.
See also related terms for olive oil.
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Ahora bien, sabemos por las fuentes literarias y los testimonios etnograficos (Brun, 1986: 56-58 y 67-68) que estas estructuras de almacenamiento de la aceituna, ademas de tener los suelos inclinados y poder estar compartimentadas (trojes) para no mezclar cosechas de varios dias, tenian como objeto favorecer la salida del alpechin (amurca) y reducir su presencia en el fruto (Pena Cervantes, 2010: 38-39); igualmente, era conveniente que no se mezclara con el aceite porque le conferia un mal sabor (Carrillo, 1995: 54).
The idea of using chemicals to control plant diseases can be traced back thousands of years to 470 BCE, when Pliny wrote that an "amurca of olives" should be sprinkled on plants to prevent blight.
The powers-that-be, Coursen later suggests, are only partially culpable for "Amurca's" deterioration; the other problem according to him is willful cultural and critical illiteracy.
In a similar way, the bags that contained the flour imported from Canada used to signal poverty, as they were bleached and used as clothes; now they have become a sign of pride in national ethnicity: "Today, in these times of harking back to and clutching at one's cultural roots, you see young people wearing flour-bag shirts or skirts, especially during the carnival season in Barbados, in London, England, in Brooklyn up in Amurca, and in Toronto during Caribana" (48).
According to Cato, the amurca repelled these insects: "To protect clothing from moths: Boil amurca down to one-half its volume and rub it over the bottom, the outside, the feet, and the corners of the chest.