amusedly


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amusedly

(əˈmjuːzɪdlɪ)
adv
in a way that shows one is amused
Translations

amusedly

advamüsiert
References in classic literature ?
For when one of the sailors lifted her into Wolf Larsen's downstretched arms, she looked up into our curious faces and smiled amusedly and sweetly, as only a woman can smile, and as I had seen no one smile for so long that I had forgotten such smiles existed.
He rolled a cigarette and watched her half curiously, half amusedly. His replies and harsh generalizations of a harsh school were disconcerting, and she came back to her earlier position.
"I assure you of it," laughed Ivan Petrovitch, gazing amusedly at the prince.
He passed amusedly over the black-eyed, frail-bodied Mrs.
She was staring at me amusedly as I tucked into my cappuccino.
However, we did note, rather amusedly, that both narratives had father-and-son dynamics, with 'Father's Day' being more approachable and less intimidating than 'Miong.'
He stared amusedly at some sites I had visited that promised to hook up bored young men with rich old women who own yatches and beach front bungalows.
In one of the snaps, Prince Charles looks amusedly at Prince George while the youngster tells him something during last year's Trooping the Color.
As I watched the picture of the three models amusedly, I saw a bit of Sim, giggling in her ragged jeans, sashaying with the bandwagon of 'cool kids'.
The surrounding 360-degree space is used artfully at times (there's at least one moment in which viewers will amusedly do a 180-degree swivel), but the film requires little of the viewer in terms of activity.
In fact, approximately once a month since last October, old postcards from Ross seem to keep popping up in places I'd forgotten I'd put them: a Monty Python "I-fart-in-your-general-direction" card from 2013 tucked in a biography of Baudelaire; a hilariously kitschy "Advice-from-a-polar-bear" card from the winter of 2016 lurking between the paperback pages of Rimbaud's Poesies; a note from September scribbled on a postcard of Hawaii (for some reason) and cards from a 2012 trip to Sydney (from the Museum of Oddities, from "Malligan's," or "Sydney's Only Irish Restaurant," the food of which, Ross amusedly assured me, was quite good, "contrary to what one might expect") at the bottom of my sacoche.
Keats rarely proceeds with such systematic rigor and is embarrassedly (or maybe just amusedly) conscious of his "clerk-like manner" here.