amyloid


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am·y·loid

 (ăm′ə-loid′)
n.
1. A starchlike substance.
2.
a. An insoluble, fibrous structure consisting chiefly of an aggregation of proteins arranged in beta sheets, forming extracellular deposits in organs or tissues and characteristic of certain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.
b. The substance that makes up such a structure.
adj.
1. Starchlike.
2. Being or related to proteinaceous amyloid: amyloid plaque.

amyloid

(ˈæmɪˌlɔɪd)
n
1. (Biochemistry) pathol a complex protein resembling starch, deposited in tissues in some degenerative diseases
2. any substance resembling starch
adj
starchlike

am•y•loid

(ˈæm əˌlɔɪd)

n.
1. a waxy, translucent substance, composed primarily of protein fibers, that is deposited in various organs of animals in certain diseases.
2. a nonnitrogenous food consisting esp. of starch.
adj.
3. of, resembling, or containing amylum.
[1855–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amyloid - a non-nitrogenous food substance consisting chiefly of starch; any substance resembling starch
amylum, starch - a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles
2.amyloid - (pathology) a waxy translucent complex protein resembling starch that results from degeneration of tissue
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
protein - any of a large group of nitrogenous organic compounds that are essential constituents of living cells; consist of polymers of amino acids; essential in the diet of animals for growth and for repair of tissues; can be obtained from meat and eggs and milk and legumes; "a diet high in protein"
Adj.1.amyloid - resembling starch
starchy - consisting of or containing starch; "starchy foods"
Translations

am·y·loid

n. amiloide, proteína que se asemeja a los almidones;
___ degenerationdegeneración ___;
___ diseaseenfermedad ___;
___ kidneyriñón ___;
___ nephrosisnefrosis ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results were classified as either amyloid positive or amyloid negative.
People with DS are at ultra-high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), because differences in their genes lead to excess production of a protein called 'amyloid', which can eventually clump together in the brain in plaques.
2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Plasma ?-amyloid (A?)42/A?40 corresponds with amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) status, according to a study published online Aug.
Years before symptoms of Alzheimer's disease appear, two kinds of damaging proteins silently collect in the brain: amyloid beta and tau.
People who had amyloid in their brain, a peptide which is used in the diagnosis for Alzheimer's, were found to have a higher amount of fatty molecules that induce sleep in blood.
BARCELONA -- Amyloid PET brain imaging changed clinical management in 60% of patients with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia and confirmed a presumptive Alzheimer's diagnosis in 95% of those with positive scans.
Ultimately, investigators hope the U.S.-wide, open-label study will prove the clinical value of amyloid PET scanning and convince the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to make the test a fully covered service.
In Alzheimer's disease, beta-amyloid proteins clump together to form amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the disease.
"Our findings suggest that having vascular risk factors like diabetes, smoking, and high blood pressure may accelerate the rate of cognitive decline in normal older adults, and that the effect of vascular risk on decline is magnified in people with higher brain amyloid levels," says Jennifer Rabin, PhD, a clinical and research fellow with the MGH Department of Psychiatry and lead author of the study.
- The final analysis at 18 months of the 856 patient Phase II clinical study in early Alzheimer's disease demonstrated statistically significant slowing in clinical decline and reduction of amyloid beta accumulated in the brain
The researchers found that cholesterol, which is one of the main components of cell walls in neurons, can trigger amyloid-beta molecules to aggregate, and their aggregation eventually leads to the formation of amyloid plaques, in a toxic chain reaction that leads to the death of brain cells.
One, amyloid beta, accumulates outside of brain cells; the other, called Tau protein, collects within the cells.