anacoluthon


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Related to anacoluthon: aposiopesis

an·a·co·lu·thon

 (ăn′ə-kə-lo͞o′thŏn′)
n. pl. an·a·co·lu·thons or an·a·co·lu·tha (-thə)
An abrupt change within a sentence to a second construction inconsistent with the first, sometimes used for rhetorical effect; for example, I warned him that if he continues to drink, what will become of him?

[Late Latin, from Late Greek anakolouthon, inconsistency in logic, from Greek, neuter of anakolouthos, inconsistent : an-, not; see a-1 + akolouthos, following (a-, together; see sem- in Indo-European roots + keleuthos, path).]

an′a·co·lu′thic adj.

anacoluthon

(ˌænəkəˈluːθɒn)
n, pl -tha (-θə)
(Rhetoric) rhetoric a construction that involves the change from one grammatical sequence to another within a single sentence; an example of anacoluthia
[C18: from Late Latin, from Greek anakolouthon, from anakolouthos not consistent, from an- + akolouthos following]

an•a•co•lu•thon

(ˌæn ə kəˈlu θɒn)

n., pl. -tha (-thə).
a grammatical construction involving a break in sequence or coherence, as It makes me so - I just get angry.
[1700–10; < Greek anakólouthon, neuter of anakólouthos not following =an- an-1 + akólouthos marching together (a- together + -kolouthos, derivative of kéleuthos road, march)]

anacoluthon

a lack of grammatical sequence or coherence, as “He ate cereal, fruit, and went to the store.” Also anacoluthia.anacoluthic, adj.
See also: Grammar
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anacoluthon - an abrupt change within a sentence from one syntactic structure to another
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
Translations
AnakoluthSatzbruch

anacoluthon

[ˌænəkəˈluːθɒn] N (anacolutha (pl)) [ˌænəkəˈluːθə]anacoluto m
References in periodicals archive ?
Pellicer-Ortin also states that the novel has recourse to narrative techniques ranging from free association of ideas to direct and indirect interior monologues, ellipses, anachronisms, anaphora, anacoluthon, and the figurative use of images (111-120).
The name for this linguistic interference in rhetoric is anacoluthon.
Hillis Miller demonstrates in his analysis of the anacoluthon, (11) each time a speaker lies, he or she becomes two speaking subjects, the I that promises the truth and the I that speaks the falsehood.
But the specific dimension of anacoluthon that would undoubtedly be of greatest interest to Chekhov is the fact that it's associated with "dramatic monologues" and "stream of consciousness.
But this definition today seems to me only a twisted phrase which, by means of two negatives, conceals an anacoluthon.
What the poet can do is invoke the immanence of nature by articulating its resistance to textual enframing, employing figural logic--the correspondences of metaphor, the extensions of catachresis, the attributions of metonymy, the substitutions of synecdoche, the inversions of chiasmus, the ruptures of anacoluthon, the subversions of irony, the opacities of paradox, the invocations of apostrophe, and the mimicries of onomatopoeia (to gather but a handful or two of pertinent figures)--to connote nature's diversity, flux, and supersession of univocal diminution.
Hayakawa had an enormous influence on the young men and women studying the art of language at that time, as the excerpt from Dow's poem For the Nonce demonstrates in such lines as, Language at its simplest has this power to enact tragic delight, especially as it begins to sing in lines or The tension of his abrupt enjambments, the stuttered definitions, shifting vectors in syntax which, cut by line-breaks, knotted by anacoluthon (to effect metaphor of locutions rather than images), yet ends up, like a magician's rope; in one piece--these haunt me with felt time: argons of alert animality pacing in thought.
sempiternal; anacoluthon, abrupt change in syntax in a sentence;
are further amplified through anacoluthon in verse 11 ("Cruelle, Herodiade en fleur du jardin clair").
The text produces an anacoluthon, an oath voiced by Jenny: "I think it is the truth.
In the classroom, AR practices what she calls the "pedagogy of anacoluthon, of syntactical disturbance," arriving "on the scene often dressed in a bizarre, post-punk manner, that is, a little outrageous, theatrical.
Likewise, trench warfare cannot be called an historical anacoluthon in the manner of the Resurrection, anticipated as such warfare was by any number of human devices, although the Great War did violently interrupt the way of life that preceded it.