anagram

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an·a·gram

 (ăn′ə-grăm′)
n.
1. A word or phrase formed by reordering the letters of another word or phrase, such as satin to stain.
2. anagrams(used with a sing. verb) A game in which players form words from a group of randomly picked letters.

[New Latin anagramma, from Greek anagrammatismos, from anagrammatizein, to rearrange letters in a word : ana-, from bottom to top; see ana- + gramma, grammat-, letter; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots.]

an′a·gram·mat′ic (-grə-măt′ĭk) adj.
an′a·gram·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
an′a·gram′ma·tize′ (-ə-tīz′) v.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

anagram

(ˈænəˌɡræm)
n
a word or phrase the letters of which can be rearranged into another word or phrase
[C16: from New Latin anagramma, shortened from Greek anagrammatismos, from anagrammatizein to transpose letters, from ana- + gramma a letter]
anagrammatic, ˌanagramˈmatical adj
ˌanagramˈmatically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•a•gram

(ˈæn əˌgræm)

n., v. -grammed, -gram•ming. n.
1. a word, phrase, or sentence formed from another by rearranging its letters: “Angel” is an anagram of “glean.”
2. anagrams, (used with a sing. v.) a game in which the players build words by transposing and, often, adding letters.
v.t.
3. to anagrammatize.
[1580–90; probably < Middle French anagramme < New Latin anagramma]
an`a•gram•mat′ic (-grəˈmæt ɪk) an`a•gram•mat′i•cal, adj.
an`a•gram•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

anagram

1. a word or phrase composed by rearranging the letters in another word or phrase.
2. a game based upon this activity.
See also: Games
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anagram - a word or phrase spelled by rearranging the letters of another word or phraseanagram - a word or phrase spelled by rearranging the letters of another word or phrase
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
antigram - an anagram that means the opposite of the original word or phrase; "`restful' is the antigram of `fluster'"
Verb1.anagram - read letters out of order to discover a hidden meaning
read - interpret something that is written or printed; "read the advertisement"; "Have you read Salman Rushdie?"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
anagram
анаграма
anagrama
anagrampřesmyčka
anagram
anagramo
anagram
anagramma
anagramma
アナグラム
anagram
anagram

anagram

[ˈænəgræm] Nanagrama m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

anagram

[ˈænəgræm] nanagramme f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

anagram

nAnagramm nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

anagram

[ˈænəgræm] nanagramma m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Thinking anagrammatically exposes what Sharpe terms the "dysgraphia" of antiblack thought, representation, and violence repeated and repositioned across and time and space.
Shek has noted, in French-Canadian and Quebecois Novels (1991), that "Anagrammatically one could read the entire novel's narrative programme--passionate love and violent murder--in 'Kamouraskaj for amour is clearly enclosed within it, leaving K ...
In 'A Challenge' (Nov 1975) Dmitri Borgmann lists transdeletions such as MONDAY-NOMAD and NOVEMBER-OVERMEN (supermen), and in August 2009 Dave Morice's anagrammatically titled 'Anagram Calendar--Arranged Almanac' includes some single-word transposals, eg MONDAY-DYNAMO and MARCH-CHARM, as well as multi-word ones like TUESDAY-SEA DUTY and DECEMBER-BED CREME.
Certainly such is the position of Caliban, whom we see to be vegetarian, in spite of his anagrammatically suggestive name (Caliban/cannibal).
These giant heads appear as from an extinct civilization; they remind us also (indeed almost anagrammatically) of the Golem (the great figure fashioned of clay in the ghettos of 'Mitteleurope') who was to rescue the Jewish people from successive waves of pogroms.
And all over Britain, indignant women will be writing to complain - anagrammatically - that "myself and my husband were disgusted" etc.
A friendship ring there was, and lots of those stringy, braidy, beadwork friendship bracelets so very burdensome that year, and rubber stamps that spelled out her first name in cavorting characters, and sweaters with her name or her initials embroidered many times over, and silvery cylinders abrim with monogrammed handkerchiefs (those twiny, outlasting triplet initials of hers once more, never adding up to a word even anagrammatically), and a good half-dozen or so handwrought books of calligraphied poems (with stapled index cards for covers) dedicated to her all but fatally.
By shifting the b and the s just two places to the right one gets "albetros." (The actual Italian word for "albatross" is albatro.) Whether this anagrammatically derived homophone worked subliminally on Coleridge is a matter for conjecture; the word would have been familiar to anyone who had read in Italian that part of the Purgatorio where Dante-pilgrim is being called upon by Beatrice to confess his sin of distraction from her image (XXXI.
He thinks of her as "admired Miranda" (3.1.46), anagrammatically and metaphorically a "diamond maiden" but he is willing to humble himself and earn her trust and her father's approval.
139), and the key to solving the puzzle is seen to be the similarity between these letters and those in his own name, even if he has to work anagrammatically to make that similarity apparent.
McEwan apparently shares Nabokov's interest in word games too; as Nabokov planted anagrams of his own name in his novels, so the authors of appendix 1, Wenn and Camia, anagrammatically recombine to spell Ian McEwan.