analcite


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a·nal·cime

 (ə-năl′sēm′) also a·nal·cite (-sīt′)
n.
A white or light-colored zeolite, NaAlSi2O6·H2O, found in certain basalts.

[French, from Greek analkimos, weak (from its weak electric power) : an-, not; see a-1 + alkimos, brave (from alkē, strength).]

a·nal·cim′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

analcite

(æˈnælsaɪt; ˈænəlˌsaɪt; -sɪt) or

analcime

n
(Minerals) a white, grey, or colourless zeolite mineral consisting of hydrated sodium aluminium silicate in cubic crystalline form. Formula: NaAlSi2O6.H2O
[C19: from Greek analkimos weak (from an- + alkimos strong, from alkē strength) + -ite1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•nal•cite

(əˈnæl saɪt, ˈæn lˌsaɪt)

also a•nal•cime

(əˈnæl sim, -saɪm, -sɪm)

n.
a white or slightly colored zeolite mineral, Na(AlSi2O6)∙H2O, generally found in crystalline form.
[1795–1805; < Greek análk(imos) weak (an- an-1 + álkimos strong) + -ite1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hinds, "Ion-exchange in crystals of analcite and leucite," Journal of the Chemical Society, pp.
Relative content of minerals, % Other minerals Sid Py Cc Do An Siderite Pyrite Calcite Dolomite Analcite 11-1 1 1 14 -- -- 11-16 -- -- 10 -- 6 11-24 -- 1 12 14 -- 11-44 1 1 4 4 -- 11-56 1 -- 6 6 12 11-93 -- -- 15 -- -- Average 1 0 10 4 3 18 Table 2.
During this period volcanic activities continued locally, represented by analcite bearing basanite and andesites.
In February 1890 Niven received "one of the best lots of minerals from Nova Scotia I have ever seen, comprising chabazite, gmelinite, analcite, stilbite and heulandite," and also offered for sale an intriguing specimen: "the finest, largest and best rhodonite specimen that doubtless has ever been found," priced very high (for the times) at $500.