analytic philosophy


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analytic philosophy

n.
1. Any of various philosophical methodologies holding that clear and precise definition and argumentation are vital to productive philosophical inquiry.
2. A philosophical school of the 20th century predominant in the United States and Great Britain whose central concerns are the nature of logic, concepts, and language. Leading practitioners have included Bertrand Russell, George Edward Moore, Rudolf Carnap, and Ludwig Wittgenstein.
References in periodicals archive ?
Malpas assembles and introduces 15 essays by American philosopher Stoutland (1933-2011) on what what philosophers should know about truth and the slingshot, Wittgenstein on certainty and truth, Putnam on truth, whether we need truth, making true, a mistaken view of Davidson's legacy: reading Lepore and Ludwig, Davidson and Dewey: a critical comparison, common sense psychology and physical science, philosophy of mind with and against Wittgenstein, the ontology of social agency, Searle's consciousness, self and society in the claims of individualism, interpreting Davidson's philosophy of action, the problems of congruence, and analytic philosophy and metaphysics.
It may not be out of place to say that the book may also be read as informative about the German sources of British analytic philosophy.--Jude P.
Analytic philosophy was refuted in the fall of 1932.
Thus, he positions himself in terms of an order of the logical, which is typical of analytic philosophy. ,,Either you start from concept, or you end with it.
The contributors deftly explore general conceptions of philosophy, centered on the question of what the point of philosophy might be; the method of conceptual analysis and its recent naturalistic critics and competitors; perspectives from continental philosophy, and also a variety of methodological views that belong neither to the mainstream of analytic philosophy, nor to continental philosophy as commonly conceived.
Agustin Echavarria: God seems to have a profound sense of irony, making the more important movement of revival of philosophical and theological reflection emerge from analytic philosophy, a tradition which once was dominated by logical positivism's strong anti-metaphysical imprint.
Hence, the work brings a wide range of fields into conversation with one another from visual culture studies and art history to analytic philosophy to musicology producing mutually illuminating approaches that challenge some of the basic suppositions of each.
For if its explosion in analytic philosophy since the 1970s originates in the sorites paradox (how many grains of sand constitute a heap?), it finds a more immediate source in the founding figures of analytic philosophy, specifically Frege and Russell (who sought to eradicate vague predicates by creating a logically precise language) and Wittgenstein (who sought to bring clarification about the relation between language and world).
From this perspective it is worth mentioning that contemporary modal logic, discussed in the essay of Sanford Shieh (Chapter 13, 'Logic, Modality, and Metaphysics in Early Analytic Philosophy: C.I.
Among the topics are the origins and development of new phenomenology, phenomenology and theology reconsidered, new phenomenology on the existence and nature of God, and proposals for new phenomenology and analytic philosophy of religion.