anapaest


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Related to anapaest: anapest

an·a·pest

also an·a·paest  (ăn′ə-pĕst′)
n.
1. A metrical foot composed of two unaccented syllables followed by one accented one, as in the word seventeen.
2. A metrical foot in quantitative verse composed of two short syllables followed by one long one.

[Latin anapaestus, from Greek anapaistos : ana-, ana- + paiein, pais-, to strike (so called because an anapest is a reversed dactyl); see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

an′a·pes′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

anapaest

(ˈænəpɛst; -piːst) or

anapest

n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot of three syllables, the first two short, the last long (˘˘¯)
[C17: via Latin from Greek anapaistos reversed (that is, a dactyl reversed), from anapaiein, from ana- back + paiein to strike]
ˌanaˈpaestic, ˌanaˈpestic, ˌanaˈpaestical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anapaest - a metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed-stressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

anapaest

anapest [ˈænəpiːst] Nanapesto m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

anapaest

, (US) anapest
n (Poet) → Anapäst m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
'tis an anapaest of AEschylus which expresses grief perfectly."
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
(30) Mansfield's rhythmic shifts, a mixture of trochees, iambs, and anapaest, convey the uncertainty of early love.
In the first of the two lines, an initial anapaest is followed by a spondee and two iambs.
= ibyc.; 4 = 1: the choriamb is a very frequent outcome of anaclasis in the first metron of hemiambic Anacreontea, while the anapaest in the beginning of the second iambic metron (line 3 = 7) is a quite possible replacement in iambic verses, although not very common).
It suggests that the line is far more irregular than it actually is, marking three different kinds of rhythmical parallelism (anapaest, monosyllable, lamb); it also exaggerates the rhythmical effect of the juxtaposed stresses and grants the monosyllabic foot ("train") too much weight.
the Chorus leader in fast recitative, not followed by chanted anapaests,
Focusing here on choral song, classicists, philologists, and other scholars discuss such topics as Alcman's first Partheneion and the song the Sirens sang, the parrhesia of young female choruses in ancient Greece, a second look at the poetics of re-enactment in Ode 13 of Bacchylides, Pindar and the Aeginetan patrai, and choral self-awareness in the introductory anapaests of Aeschylus; Supplices.
(4) In classical Greek and Latin, dactyls, anapaests, iambs and so on were patterns of long and short syllables.
The metre moves in rapid anapaests through the detail of the horses' manes to the 'jolt' of electricity.
There are four stress-peaks to a line separated by an irregular mixture of iambics and anapaests. The stress dynamic pushes the narrative forward, together with the short sequences of lines in each stanza that end in unstressed syllables and are resolved with a line which ends in a syllable that ticks upward into a stress.