anaphora


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Related to anaphora: asyndeton

a·naph·o·ra

 (ə-năf′ər-ə)
n.
1. The deliberate repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several successive verses, clauses, or paragraphs; for example, "We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills" (Winston S. Churchill).
2. Linguistics The use of a linguistic unit, such as a pronoun, to refer to the same person or object as another unit, usually a noun. The use of her to refer to the person named by Anne in the sentence Anne asked Edward to pass her the salt is an example of anaphora.

[Late Latin, from Greek, from anapherein, to bring back : ana-, ana- + pherein, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

an′a·phor′ic (ăn′ə-fôr′ĭk) adj.

anaphora

(əˈnæfərə) or

anaphor

n
1. (Grammar) grammar the use of a word such as a pronoun that has the same reference as a word previously used in the same discourse. In the sentence John wrote the essay in the library but Peter did it at home, both did and it are examples of anaphora. Compare cataphora, exophoric
2. (Rhetoric) rhetoric the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
[C16: via Latin from Greek: repetition, from anapherein, from ana- + pherein to bear]

a•naph•o•ra

(əˈnæf ər ə)

n.
1. the use of a word as a regular grammatical substitute for a preceding word or group of words, as the use of it and do in I know it and they do, too.
2. repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive phrases, verses, clauses, or sentences, as in Shakespeare's “This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.”
[1580–90; < Late Latin < Greek: act of carrying back, reference, n. derivative of anaphérein to carry back, refer to (ana- ana- + phérein to bear1; compare -phore)]
a•naph′o•ral, adj.

anaphora

the repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive verses or clauses, as the repetition of Blessed in the Beatitudes. Cf. epanaphora, epiphora.anaphoral, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

anaphora

Repetition of a word or words at the beginnings of successive clauses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anaphora - using a pronoun or similar word instead of repeating a word used earlier
repetition - the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
2.anaphora - repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
repetition - the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
Translations
anafora
anafora
anafooranafora

anaphora

n (Liter, Gram) → Anapher f
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the poems by Maria Concepcion Bautista Vazquez are weaker, as their melopoeia can't be re-created; however, when she uses anaphora, as in the poem "I Am," the reader can glimpse into the crackling hearth of her imagination, as she finds herself reflected in the "hummingbird" or in the "cricket at night.
Specifically, I propose to develop more advanced games-with-a-purpose to collect massive amounts of data about anaphora from people playing a game.
As we see in such a list, indeed, it is not syntax but anaphora that is crucial to listmaking.
3) Rhetorical devices such as anaphora aimed at emphasizing a particular point of the discourse.
This type of Endophoric reference is called Anaphora.
The couplets of "More on Finishing, the confined Quatrains for a Calling," and the anaphora of "A Byzantine Diptych" create a clean expectedness which contrasts the tumultuous sections that precede them.
The first question I would like to consider is that of the translation of lexical anaphora from French to English.
This chapter also focuses on the status of NP which is discussed using the contextual factors specificity, definiteness and anaphora.
In the Anaphora task children have to solve either syntactic and semantic anaphora problems, and store and remember the word solution in a growing series of inferential problems.
00) gives plans of Jerusalem, the Church of the Anastasis, and translations of fourth-century texts (Egeria's Diary, The Anaphora [Communion liturgy], The Liturgy of St.
The unusual word count of one-hundred seems okay, yet his first constraint rules out anadiplosis or epanalepsis: every anaphora is anathema.
Offers a detailed reading of "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry," focusing on Whitman's use of anaphora, exploring "left-margin activation" in a time when most "right-margin forms feel unavailable--overfreighted with bad histories or standing as nostalgic, falsifying pattern-consolations for the abyssal complexity of everyday life"; "instead of metaphor's ferrying-across we have in 'Crossing Brooklyn Ferry' anaphora's constant vertical stream of carrying-back.