anaphoral

anaphoral

(əˈnæfərəl)
adj
relating to the prayer of oblation and consecration performed during Holy Communion
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, the speaker's emotional attachment to the community and its history is apparent in the anaphoral "O" he uses, seven times in total, to introduce new objects of recollection.
Taft, "Problems in Anaphoral Theology: 'Words of Consecration' versus 'Consecratory Epiclesis.
Lengthy citation and analysis of early anaphoral, homiletic, and catechetical texts, in conjunction with some treatment of socioecclesial contexts, leads by the end of chapter 4 to brief theological discussions of sacrifice, real presence, and communion.
For all their awkwardness and daring, with their iterative insistence on "douleur" resulting from tyranny, the final fourteen lines establish an anaphoral flow in the second half of the poem, which they render increasingly incantatory.
The position of the intercessions seems to be borrowed from the Syro-Byzantine anaphoral shape, but their context is that of the Alexandrine tradition.
From this hypothetical yoser came the sanctus-epiklesis unit in the Egyptian anaphoral tradition, and it perhaps also stands behind the Catechetical Homilies of Theodore of Mopsuestia and the Mystagogical Catecheses of Cyril of Jerusalem.
Justification for including preface chants in the Beneventanum troporum corpus arises from the fact that the Sanctus, alone among the Ordinary chants of the Mass, must be introduced by an anaphoral chant in which the celebrant invites the singers to join "with angels and archangels" in a hymn (i.
Taft ("Understanding the Byzantine Anaphoral Oblation"), and Regis Duffy ("The Medicus and Its Transformation from Its Patristic to Its Medieval and Tridentine Usages").
his earlier study of the meal prayers in the Didache is not included), and, especially, the more recent work of Enrico Mazza on the origins of the eucharistic prayer, for whom the meal prayers of Didache 9 and 10 figure so prominently in his attempt at interpreting early Christian anaphoral construction in general.
Johnson treats the anaphora at great length, and here he seems to take more literary and liturgical license than with any of the other prayers, and approaches the task with certain a priori views on anaphoral development.
Something of its findings have already been available in the author's Grove Liturgical Study, Fourth Century Anaphoral Construction Techniques i986, and The Significance of Similarities in the Anaphoral Intercession Sequence in the Coptic Anaphoras of St Basil and other ancient liturgies', Studia Patristica 18/2 (1989).
First, however, Fenwick sketches the historical background to the various areas with which the versions of Basil are associated, and the West Syrian anaphoral pattern.